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View Full Version : Is this the year we finally draft our future Center?



hawaiiansteel
03-15-2010, 06:08 PM
last year the Steelers were interested in drafting centers Alex Mack and Eric Wood in the first round, and then tried unsuccessfully to trade up and draft Max Unger in the second round.

so a year has gone by and what has changed? have Hartwig and/or Legursky convinced the coaching staff that they have improved enough to where we don't need to draft a center like we tried so hard to do last year?

this is not a deep year at the C position, there are only five that i would be interested in drafting:

Maurkice Pouncey, Matt Tennant, J.D Walton, Ted Larsen or Eric Olsen.

we need to infuse some talent and add some competition here badly in order to protect our franchise QB and get the running game going.

Albert Einstein's definition of Insanity: "doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results."

Chadman
03-15-2010, 06:15 PM
Like Tennant- not wrapped on the others.

Legursky looks as good a prospect as the guys you list after Tennant, and Pouncey, for all the hoopla surrounding him, hasn't blocked in a 'traditional' offence, which concerns Chadman.

Is there any truth to the rumour of Urbik being tried at Center?

pfelix73
03-15-2010, 06:34 PM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

hawaiiansteel
03-15-2010, 07:57 PM
Like Tennant- not wrapped on the others.

Legursky looks as good a prospect as the guys you list after Tennant, and Pouncey, for all the hoopla surrounding him, hasn't blocked in a 'traditional' offence, which concerns Chadman.

Is there any truth to the rumour of Urbik being tried at Center?



it will be interesting to see if Urbik is tried at C this pre-season or if he concentrates on his natural RG position and sees if he can at least dress on game days.

RuthlessBurgher
03-15-2010, 09:00 PM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

Who do you suggest would be a quality CB with the 18th pick? If Haden falls, then he is the guy. But what about if not? Do you think Earl Thomas would be a good enough CB on this level, when most are projecting his best position to be FS? Would you reach for a player like Kyle Wilson at #18 just to fill a need at CB when there may better value elsewhere? There are a dozen or so CB's with day two grades that we could aim for in round 2 or 3 instead...

Steel Life
03-15-2010, 09:42 PM
I'll throw a couple of curveballs out there, how about...Mitch Petrus (OG, Arkansas) as a OC prospect? Certainly he has the strength to handle the bull-rush & pulling & trapping is considered one of his better attributes. Another one to watch out for a OC conversion might be Doug Palmer (OG, East Carolina).

Shawn
03-15-2010, 09:56 PM
Like Tennant- not wrapped on the others.

Legursky looks as good a prospect as the guys you list after Tennant, and Pouncey, for all the hoopla surrounding him, hasn't blocked in a 'traditional' offence, which concerns Chadman.

Is there any truth to the rumour of Urbik being tried at Center?

Agreed Tennant would be a terrific value in the 4th or 5th. I do not believe Pouncey is 2-3 rounds better than Tennant.

pfelix73
03-15-2010, 10:11 PM
It's about time some of my ECU folk get some love on these boards. We got Ross and Joseph on a few mocks, now Palmer. Cool.

Skip had a good team the past years, if only we had a QB.... oh well.

To answer Ruthless's question, I think if they don't get Haden then the boy from Texas could play CB. He might even be a better CB than Haden. He's supposedly i for a visit. Our secondary is weak and needs upgraded. I'm fine with the OL the way it is. There's plenty of depth again, considering we just signed another OT from Buffalo- Hills could get the boot.

How about:

Haden round 1
Gerhardt round 2

for starters
:tt1

Steel Life
03-15-2010, 10:48 PM
I got your back Felix :Cheers ...Joseph would be a great pick-up for DL depth & Palmer could be stashed on the PS for development.

Chadman
03-15-2010, 10:50 PM
I got your back Felix :Cheers ...Joseph would be a great pick-up for DL depth & Palmer could be stashed on the PS for development.

Anyone that weighs 330lbs, has long arms, measures over 6'4" and runs a 40 yard dash in just over 5.00 is going before the 5th round.

If you want Joseph- look AT LEAST 1 Round higher. Because with the amount of 3-4 on the market, you can bet someone else is...

NJ-STEELER
03-15-2010, 10:59 PM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

Who do you suggest would be a quality CB with the 18th pick? If Haden falls, then he is the guy. But what about if not? Do you think Earl Thomas would be a good enough CB on this level, when most are projecting his best position to be FS? Would you reach for a player like Kyle Wilson at #18 just to fill a need at CB when there may better value elsewhere? There are a dozen or so CB's with day two grades that we could aim for in round 2 or 3 instead...


i would take him at 18.

i think its a position we need to upgrade badly.

papillon
03-15-2010, 11:13 PM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

Who do you suggest would be a quality CB with the 18th pick? If Haden falls, then he is the guy. But what about if not? Do you think Earl Thomas would be a good enough CB on this level, when most are projecting his best position to be FS? Would you reach for a player like Kyle Wilson at #18 just to fill a need at CB when there may better value elsewhere? There are a dozen or so CB's with day two grades that we could aim for in round 2 or 3 instead...

Never reach, that's first and foremost. Earl Thomas still makes the most sense to me, he's versatile and would bring value. He can play FS, SS and CB in that order, but you never know when you'll need him in a pinch. He gives the Steelers options and pushes veterans to perform.

I can't see them passing on him if he's there at 1.18; IMO, he wo9n't make it that far, other teams are going to like him when they talk with him.

Pappy

steelblood
03-16-2010, 10:09 AM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

Who do you suggest would be a quality CB with the 18th pick? If Haden falls, then he is the guy. But what about if not? Do you think Earl Thomas would be a good enough CB on this level, when most are projecting his best position to be FS? Would you reach for a player like Kyle Wilson at #18 just to fill a need at CB when there may better value elsewhere? There are a dozen or so CB's with day two grades that we could aim for in round 2 or 3 instead...

Earl Thomas-the idea that Thomas is best at FS is predicated on his great instinctual play. Since we play less press man and more off-man, zone, and even some 3-deep, instinctual play at corner could be capitalized in our system. Thomas is a ballhawk. We need DBs that can pick off the ball. I'd take him in a heartbeat. Whether he ends up a corner or a FS doesn't really matter to me. If we could get Burnett and Thomas on the field next season (at least in nickel and dime situations), we could pick off a ton of balls. Those two with Troy could be very special.

pfelix73
03-16-2010, 10:19 AM
True- OK, we made a decision. the Steelers are going to draft Earl Thomas if he's available with the 18th pick.

Now, let's open up the debate for round #2. I'm going with the RB from Stanford. Gerhardt....All in Favor? Say I.

LOL

:stirpot

Oviedo
03-16-2010, 11:10 AM
There is plenty of competition at Center with Hartwig and Legursky- I like Legursky as our future Center. You can throw Urbik into the mix as well or maybe a rook later in the draft. We have enough linemen for competition. As far as OT goes, this is a make or break year for Hills.

We need to address the secondary- CB. With that 18th pick. IMO.
:tt1

Who do you suggest would be a quality CB with the 18th pick? If Haden falls, then he is the guy. But what about if not? Do you think Earl Thomas would be a good enough CB on this level, when most are projecting his best position to be FS? Would you reach for a player like Kyle Wilson at #18 just to fill a need at CB when there may better value elsewhere? There are a dozen or so CB's with day two grades that we could aim for in round 2 or 3 instead...

Earl Thomas-the idea that Thomas is best at FS is predicated on his great instinctual play. Since we play less press man and more off-man, zone, and even some 3-deep, instinctual play at corner could be capitalized in our system. Thomas is a ballhawk. We need DBs that can pick off the ball. I'd take him in a heartbeat. Whether he ends up a corner or a FS doesn't really matter to me. If we could get Burnett and Thomas on the field next season (at least in nickel and dime situations), we could pick off a ton of balls. Those two with Troy could be very special.

Like Haden at Florida, Thomas was a "ballhawk" on a team that routinely got early double digit leads on their opponents thereby forcing their oppoentents to throw the ball to catch up or even get close. Therefore both Haden and Thomas played a ton of games that they knew almost every play was going to be a pass play. It's pretty easy to pad your stats in games like that and earn the "ballhawk" moniker.

More insightful is watching them in close tough games. I saw Haden in those games and while he may be good he wasn't great. I think the same is probably true of Thomas. Anyone remember him being a difference maker in the Nebraska game or the Alabama game??? I don't.

Be careful before you annoint these DBs as the next Rod Woodson. They played on stacked teams that typically overwhelmed their opponents. Look at the close games and you will probably get a more accurate take on their abilities.

pfelix73
03-16-2010, 12:29 PM
Troy was the same way too. Played on a team that scored a ton of points.

Again- we need a Rod Woodson like CB on this team and we don't have it. It's time to invest in one who could be a big-time CB- see D. Revis.

Oviedo
03-16-2010, 01:18 PM
Troy was the same way too. Played on a team that scored a ton of points.

Again- we need a Rod Woodson like CB on this team and we don't have it. It's time to invest in one who could be a big-time CB- see D. Revis.

There is no D Revis in this draft. That solves the issue.

Taking the "best" Cb in a particular year does not get you Rod Woodson, D Revis, Shawn Springs, etc. This is not a good year for elite CBs. Good CBs=yes. Elite=NO!!!!

RuthlessBurgher
03-16-2010, 01:25 PM
Troy was the same way too. Played on a team that scored a ton of points.

Again- we need a Rod Woodson like CB on this team and we don't have it. It's time to invest in one who could be a big-time CB- see D. Revis.

Who would you suggest? There are not any Rod Woodson like CB's in this draft (and frankly, saying that you are looking for a Rod Woodson like CB is like saying you are looking for a Jerry Rice like WR...All Time Great Hall of Famers don't exactly grow on trees). I hoping that Haden cannot improve on his 40 time at his Pro Day tomorrow, so perhaps he drops to #18. If not, the next best corners, Kyle Wilson and Devin McCourty have late first round grades, so they would be overdrafted at #18 if we didn't trade down. The only other option would be to draft FS Earl Thomas, who many believe has the coverage ability to play corner. The best CB in college football, LSU's Patrick Peterson, will be playing in Baton Rouge next year, and will likely be a top 5 pick in 2011.

pfelix73
03-16-2010, 04:00 PM
And just how do you know that? Do you have that crystal ball? The draft is a crap shoot.

I'd be willing to bet that a Haden picked in the 1st round would have a better chance at being an all-pro than those 2 bench warmers we drafted last year, or any other low round CB from this year.
:lol:

Oviedo
03-16-2010, 04:08 PM
And just how do you know that? Do you have that crystal ball? The draft is a crap shoot.

I'd be willing to bet that a Haden picked in the 1st round would have a better chance at being an all-pro than those 2 bench warmers we drafted last year, or any other low round CB from this year.
:lol:

Since none of us have crystal balls so Haden could be like another former Steelers #1 pick...Chad Scott. Maybe Dwayne Washington?

I predict he won't break a 4.5 40 tomorrow at his Pro Day. If he does break 4.5 it will be high 4.4s, i.e. 4.48 or 4.49.

RuthlessBurgher
03-16-2010, 04:18 PM
And just how do you know that? Do you have that crystal ball? The draft is a crap shoot.

I'd be willing to bet that a Haden picked in the 1st round would have a better chance at being an all-pro than those 2 bench warmers we drafted last year, or any other low round CB from this year.
:lol:

Since none of us have crystal balls so Haden could be like another former Steelers #1 pick...Chad Scott. Maybe Dwayne Washington?

I predict he won't break a 4.5 40 tomorrow at his Pro Day. If he does break 4.5 it will be high 4.4s, i.e. 4.48 or 4.49.

I'll drink to that! I hope he runs a poor 40 so he can fall to us. Straight line speed is far from the most important attribute for a quality CB. He can cover and support the run way better than some track star corner than runs a 4.28.

pfelix73
03-16-2010, 04:49 PM
Agreed. Nuf said. All this draft crap is for the birds.. Can't wait til it's over.. It's being over analyzed to death. We need more depth at the CB position..

hawaiiansteel
03-16-2010, 05:35 PM
National Football Post OC Rankings

RANK PLAYER, POS, COLLEGE
01 Maurkice Pouncey C, Florida
NFP Grade: 7.5
Scouting Report:
Maurkice Pouncey: No. 56, C, 6-5, 318

A massive center prospect who showcases impressive bend and initial quickness off the snap for his size, Pouncey does a great job of keeping his base low and gaining initial leverage on contact. He possesses a powerful lower body and does a great job of getting his hands inside opposing defenders and driving them off the ball. He's a gifted in-line run blocker and has the ability to consistently push at the point of attack. Pouncey snaps and steps quickly in the pass game and has the fluidity and balance to slide laterally in space and mirror opposing linemen in pass protection. He's fluid for his size with the anchor strength to sit into his stance and keep the pocket clean. One of the best centers to come along in years, Pouncey's combination of size, power and athleticism will likely make him one of the top players at his position in the NFL for years to come.

Grade: 7.5

02 Matt Tennant C, Boston College
NFP Grade: 6.9
Scouting Report:
Matt Tennant: No. 65, C, 6-4, 292

A tall, long-armed center who plays with a good pad level in pass protection, Tennant does a nice job keeping his base down and redirecting in space. He generates good power on contact and exhibits a strong, compact punch. He does a nice job sliding laterally on contact, maintaining his balance and anchoring inside. Tennant possesses a powerful upper body and does a great job getting his hands under the chest plate of opposing linemen and locking on at the point of attack. But he does have a tendency to overextend at times and will lunge into blocks. He's an above-average athlete who does a good job getting around defenders on slide-down blocks, but he lacks the quickness to make up for a false step in pass protection.

Tennant is a Velcro player who uses his length to stay on blocks through the play and control linemen on contact. He pumps his legs through contact in the run game and has the power to handle big DTs one-on-one inside and not give them a sniff of the football. He doesn't fire off the ball low and doesn't generate much initial pop on contact. He's more of a catcher who uses his length to stay on blocks and turn defenders from the ball.

Grade: 6.9

03 J.D. Walton C, Baylor
NFP Grade: 6.8
Scouting Report:
J.D. Walton: No. 55, C, 6-3, 305

A natural bender who gets into opposing linemen quickly off the snap, Walton has the body control to angle them away from the play. He's coordinated on the move and does a nice job extending his arms and walking defenders down the line on slide-down blocks. He snaps and steps quickly and has the power in his base to create a bit of a push off the ball. He exhibits good balance on contact and works hard through blocks, showcasing a mean streak in the run game. He does a nice job getting into blocks off the snap and has enough power to create an initial surge, but lacks the power to overwhelm defensive tackles at the point of attack. Walton showcases the coordination to chip at the line and reach a moving target at the second level.

He looked a lot more comfortable in space this season and consistently was able to break down and seal his man away from the play. He sets quickly in the pass game and does a great job instantly getting his hands up and into opposing defenders bodies. He showcases good hand placement on contact and consistently gains leverage at the point. He exhibits impressive short-area quickness and does a nice job sliding his feet when engaged and mirroring linemen inside. Walton looks like a guy who will be able to win a starting job in the NFL and anchor the interior of an offensive line for years to come.

Grade: 6.8

04 Kenny Alfred C, Washington State
NFP Grade: 6.3
Scouting Report:
Kenny Alfred: No. 69, C, 6-2, 300

An impressive athlete who fires off the ball quickly and does a great job reaching targets away from his frame, Alfred possesses coordinated footwork and looks comfortable extending his arms into blocks and getting his feet around opposing linemen. He exhibits good balance and footwork in the pass game and consistently keeps his head on a swivel. He does a nice job cleanly redirecting and working in tandem with his guards but can be slow to recognize stunts and blitzes inside. He moves his hands and feet in sync and knows how to maintain the upper hand through contact. But he consistently allows himself to get jolted at the point of attack and needs to do a better job keeping his base down in pass protection. Alfred does a nice job gathering himself after the initial surge and regaining leverage inside. He snaps and steps quickly in the run game and consistently does a good job sealing defenders away from the ball.

He isn't overly physical at the point of attack but possesses the athletic ability to chip at the line and reach targets the second level. He looks natural when asked get downfield, but he will occasionally overextend into blocks and get slipped on contact. Overall, he's a good athlete who doesn't give up much penetration inside and looks natural on the move in the run game. He needs to learn to play with a more consistent base in pass protection, but he possesses the skill set to eventually mature into a starting lineman at the next level.

Grade: 6.3

05 Kevin Matthews C, Texas A&M
NFP Grade: 5.9
Scouting Report:
Kevin Matthews: No. 63, OC, 6-4, 310

A big, thickly built center who does a great job getting his hands up initially under opposing linemen and gaining leverage, Matthews displays an average first step off the ball but can get into blocks quickly because of his great hands. He stays on opposing tackles as an inline guy, but he lacks ideal quickness off the ball when trying to reach linemen off his frame and isn't fluid on the move. He displays impressive balance and power on contact and can anchor vs. the bull-rush. He does a nice job locking on to defenders in the pass game and is a Velcro player.

He's a better lateral athlete than given credit for and looks a lot more comfortable sliding his feet in pass protection than he does in the run game. He looks natural taking proper angles at the second level but isn't the type of balanced athlete to chip and get downfield. Kevin is the son of former All-Pro Bruce Matthews, and you can tell he has a great feel for the game. He has great hands and plays with leverage but is a limited athlete in the run game.

Grade: 5.9

06 Ted Larsen C, North Carolina State
NFP Grade: 5.9
Scouting Report:
Ted Larsen: No. 58, C, 6-2, 300

Larsen is quick to set in the pass game and does a nice job keeping his base down and dropping his pad level on contact. He redirects well in space and has the lower body strength to anchor on contact. He showcases good athleticism in the run game and has the body control to chip at the line and reach defenders at the second level. Larsen gets stronger as the game goes on. He has the power in his lower half to get an initial punch up front. He's a good enough athlete to stay on blocks and drive his legs through contact, but he isn't long-armed and has a tendency to get overextended when trying to get into blocks. He can be sidestepped too easily inside and struggles to win initial hand battles.

Grade: 5.9

07 John Estes C, Hawaii
NFP Grade: 5.8
Scouting Report:
John Estes: No. 55, C, 6-2, 300

Estes exhibits good flexibility and extension when asked to sit into his stance. He moves his feet well on contact and can mirror once he gets his hands on a defender. However, he lacks lower body strength and struggles to anchor vs. the bull-rush. Estes is consistently bulled into the backfield and struggles to keep the interior of the line clean. He showcases a decent first step off the snap. He has the ability to reach defenders off his frame in the run game and then to seal them away from the ball. He does a nice job closing lanes on either side of him off the snap and has the short-area quickness to redirect. However, Estes lacks the strength to stay on blocks when defenders gain a step on him off the snap and struggles when he's not squared up with his man. His lack of strength will follow him around the NFL.

Grade: 5.8

08 Joel Nitchman C, Michigan State
NFP Grade: 5.7
Scouting Report:
Joel Nitchman: No. 65, C, 6-3, 296

Nitchman displays good natural anchor strength and can hold the point of attack one-on-one inside. He does a nice job staying on blocks and is heavy- handed on contact. He extends his arms into blocks well and does a nice job of locking out in pass protection. But he isn't the best athlete. He displays a good initial jolt on the move but has a tendency to get overextended and fall off blocks. He displays average lateral mobility inside. He can redirect cleanly and is gritty inside, and he does a nice job of making it tough to disengage from his blocks. But he lacks the type of fluidity to mirror explosive defenders one-on-one in space. He reminds me a bit of Raiders center Chris Morris.

Grade: 5.7

09 Eric Olsen C, Notre Dame
NFP Grade: 5.7
Scouting Report:
Eric Olsen: No. 55, C, 6-4, 305

Olsen looks natural inside and does a great job quickly getting out of his stance after the snap. He showcases good power in his base and consistently extends his arms and gains leverage on contact. He does a great job sitting into his stance and anchoring inside at the point of attack. Olsen showcases good short-area quickness and has the fluidity to stay in front of blocks inside. He isn't overly powerful in run game but works his feet through contact and possesses the body control to consistently get around defenders and seal them away from the ball. His combination of quickness and anchor strength makes him a factor inside, and he looks like one of the nation's top centers.

Grade: 5.7

10 Garrett Anderson C, South Carolina
NFP Grade: 5.7
Scouting Report:
Garrett Anderson: 70, C, 6-4, 308

Anderson showcases good initial quickness off the ball and possesses the body control to get his hands inside the frame of opposing defenders. He plays with natural leverage for his size and consistently exhibits proper hand technique on contact. He moves his feet well through contact and has the ability to stay on blocks. He gets into opposing linemen quickly in the run game and has the initial power to create some movement inside. But Anderson isn't fluid in space and struggles to quickly redirect and hit a moving target.

Grade: 5.7

11 Jim Cordle C, Ohio State
NFP Grade: 5.6
Scouting Report:
Jim Cordle: No. 64, OL, 6-4, 298

Cordle exhibits a narrow base and isn't flexible out of his stance, which causes him to struggle in generating power from his lower half. He isn't explosive off the ball in the pass game and struggles reaching interior linemen penetrating off his frame. He does a better job of reaching linemen in the run game and gaining an initial surge but has a tendency to lunge into blocks and fails to engage on contact. He showcases a decent punch into opposing linemen but isn't a Velcro player and struggles staying on his man. Cordle is a good straight-line athlete who has the ability to get up to speed quickly when asked to reach and seal a target at the second level. He does a nice job keeping his head up and working his legs through contact but lacks ideal body control and is consistently shed after his initial push. He's only an interior lineman at the next level but needs to add more power in all areas to have a chance in the NFL.

Grade: 5.6

12 Chris Hall C, Texas
NFP Grade: 5.5
Scouting Report:
Chris Hall: No. 71, C, 6-4, 295 Only an average athlete, Hall gets out of his stance quickly and has the range to hit/seal a moving target off his frame. He does a nice job keeping his base down in space and generating good power on contact in the open field. He lacks ideal power as an inline run blocker but understands angles and displays good balance and hand placement on contact. Hall does a nice job getting his body around defenders and sealing them away from the ball. He showcases the flexibility to sit into his stance, extend his arms and anchor on contact. He struggles to quickly redirect and mirror in space. He lacks the type of power to stay on a block once an opposing lineman gains a step (see Gerald McCoy, Oklahoma tape). He lacks the type of athleticism needed to make up for his average strength and size. Grade: 5.5

13 Rafael Eubanks C, Iowa
NFP Grade: 5.5
Scouting Report:
Rafael Eubanks: No. 63, C, 6-3, 280

Eubanks is natural bender who does a nice job keeping his base down off the snap, getting his hands up and sliding laterally in pass protection. Showcases the ability to win most hand battles inside against defensive tackles, but he lacks power at the point of attack. Displays the coordination and athleticism to stay on opposing linemen on slide-down blocks. Struggles to get any kind of push off the snap and is disengaged from and falls off blocks too easily on contact. Even in the pass game, he does a nice job playing with natural leverage, but he simply lacks the base strength to anchor on contact. Is consistently overwhelmed against the bull-rush and bullied into the backfield one-on-one. Displays some natural athleticism and could draw some interest from zone-blocking teams. He needs to add more power in his base to have a chance to hold up inside against NFL-caliber linemen.

Grade: 5.5

14 Sean Allen C, East Carolina
NFP Grade: 5.4
Scouting Report:
none

15 Jorge Gonzalez C, Kentucky
NFP Grade: 5.4
Scouting Report:
Jorge Gonzalez: No. 61, C, 6-3, 300

Gonzalez isn't an athletic lineman and struggles sliding his feet and maintaining his balance in pass protection. He has a tendency to lunge into blocks and consistently gets overextended at the point of attack. He struggles to sit into his stance vs. the bull rush and can be overwhelmed on contact. But he displays much better pop and overall technique in the run game. He's a short-area blocker who understands angles, extends his arms on contact and can seal inside. He possesses above-average natural power on contact off the snap and can create a bit of an initial surge on contact. But Gonzalez looks stiff when asked to get out to the second level and struggles to hit/seal defenders in space. Overall, he grades out poorly as a pass blocker, and his average run-blocking ability doesn't make up for his lack of athleticism in space.

Grade: 5.4

16 Ryan Blaszczyk C, Rutgers
NFP Grade: 5.4
Scouting Report:
Ryan Blaszczyk: No. 61, C, 6-3, 295

A flexible lineman, Blaszczyk snaps and steps quickly out of his stance. He possesses the athleticism to reach targets off his frame. Understanding angles, he gets his feet around opposing linemen and seals them away from the ball. Showcases a good initial pop on contact in the run game and does a nice job working his hands and maintaining balance. He isn't overly powerful through in his lower half, but he works hard to stay on blocks and turn linemen away from the ball. Isn't a guy who can simply drive defenders off the ball. Showcases good awareness in the pass game and does a nice job keeping his head on a swivel, playing with a low base on contact.

Possesses solid footwork and athleticism in space and exhibits the ability to slide his feet while engaged. But he lacks the power to consistently lock out inside and can be bull-rushed into the backfield by bigger defensive linemen. Lacking ideal lower-body strength, he has a tendency to get too straight-legged in order to anchor inside. At times, he can be shed easily when trying to hold up against power. He doesn't stand out in any area of the game, but he finds a way get the job done, displaying the toughness to consistently work until the whistle. He should have a chance to compete for an NFL roster spot in training camp.

Grade: 5.4

17 Daverin Geralds C, Ole Miss
NFP Grade: 5.3
Scouting Report:
Daverin Geralds: No. 72, C, 6-0, 312

A short, stocky center who plays with natural leverage and does a nice job sinking his hips into blocks and anchoring inside, Geralds has a tendency to get a bit overextended into blocks and lose his balance. He does a nice job turning defenders away from the ball in the run game but doesn't exhibit great power as an inline guy. He's a limited athlete in space who showcases little range and struggles to hit/reach a moving target.

Grade: 5.3

18 Tim Walter C, Colorado State
NFP Grade: 5.1
Scouting Report:
Tim Walter: No. 57, C, 6-4, 290

Walter is a tall pivot who struggles to sit into his stance in pass protection and gets too upright on contact. He showcases the ability to drop his pad level when trying to anchor but isn't a gifted athlete and will get caught overextending into blocks. He lacks the type of lateral quickness to mirror in space. Walter possesses decent hand placement inside but struggles moving his feet laterally and making up for a false step. He doesn't have the type of power to stay on blocks once opponents gain a step and he allows them to easily work their way through contact. He does a better job playing with bend and leverage in the run game but lacks ideal power on contact and struggles to handle blocks one-on-one. He's more of a catcher who is asked to steer blocks. He's rarely the aggressor.

Grade: 5.1

19 Carl Barnett C, Houston
NFP Grade: 5.1
Scouting Report:
Carl Barnett: No. 57, C, 6-2, 288

An undersized center prospect, Barnett lacks ideal power and girth in his lower half. Has a tendency to overextend to make up for his lack of strength. He gets really wide with his footwork at times, which causes him to struggle shuffling laterally. Although he does a nice job staying on blocks and getting his hands inside, Barnett lacks the body control to mirror defensive linemen when he's engaged. Lacks ideal body control and coordination when asked to break down at the second level. He struggles to hit a moving target in space. Doesn't generate much pop on contact as an in-line run guy. He does a decent job keeping his pad level down, but he doesn't have much power in his lower half. Lacks the power, girth and footwork to hold his own one-on-one at the next level.

Grade: 5.1

20 Eddie Adamski C, Northern Illinois
NFP Grade: 5.1
Scouting Report:
Eddie Adamski: No. 50, C, 6-3, 285

Despite his size, Adamski isn't a really gifted athlete. He looks top-heavy and soft, especially through the midsection. Possesses a decent first step off the snap, but he struggles to reach/hit targets at the second level and is really stiff in the open field. Adamski does a nice job working in tandem with his guards in pass protection, he but struggles to keep his base down and maintain balance when asked to match up one-on-one. Has a tendency to get too upright, will overextended into blocks and is slow to move his feet. Lacks the type of athleticism and bend to stay with NFL-caliber defensive tackles inside.