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View Full Version : Question about winning a division...can someone explain?



LordVile
11-18-2009, 05:52 PM
I've only been into football for 2 years but I am curious to know what it takes to win a division? Example: If a team wins all six divisonal games, but theoretically loses all other games in the reg season (6-10) and another team within their division has a better season record but with no divisional wins, who get's the division title? I'd assume it to be the team who wins the most games WITHIN their own division but I don't have a def answer... Can someone shed light on this??

Thanks in advance.

BURGH86STEEL
11-18-2009, 06:22 PM
I've only been into football for 2 years but I am curious to know what it takes to win a division? Example: If a team wins all six divisonal games, but theoretically loses all other games in the reg season (6-10) and another team within their division has a better season record but with no divisional wins, who get's the division title? I'd assume it to be the team who wins the most games WITHIN their own division but I don't have a def answer... Can someone shed light on this??

Thanks in advance.

The team with the most wins, wins the division. If 2 teams finish with the same records, lets say 11-5 & 11-5, there are all kinds of tie breakers that come into play.

The Bengals have the tie breaker over the Steelers because they beat them twice.

Let's say the Steelers and Bengals split, it would come down to records within the division. If division records are same, I believe it comes down to conference records or common opponents.

SteelAbility
11-18-2009, 06:49 PM
Yup. Overall record is King.

After division record comes conference record (the higher winning percentage takes it).
In the event that the two teams don't play the same number of conference games (which I t-h-i-n-k is possible) the higher winning percentage takes it (e.g. 7-5 beats 8-6).

RuthlessBurgher
11-18-2009, 07:14 PM
Yup. Overall record is King.

After division record comes conference record (the higher winning percentage takes it).
In the event that the two teams don't play the same number of conference games (which I t-h-i-n-k is possible) the higher winning percentage takes it (e.g. 7-5 beats 8-6).

Every team plays 12 conference games and 4 non-conference games.

SteelAbility
11-19-2009, 08:31 AM
Yup. Overall record is King.

After division record comes conference record (the higher winning percentage takes it).
In the event that the two teams don't play the same number of conference games (which I t-h-i-n-k is possible) the higher winning percentage takes it (e.g. 7-5 beats 8-6).

Every team plays 12 conference games and 4 non-conference games.

Roger that. I wasn't sure about the two "float" games. I thought they could cross conferences.

LordVile here's a little bonus as far as game scheduling. I figure since you were unsure of the division winning rules, you probably don't know the game scheduling rules. You can use it to instantly know 14 of the Steelers matchups before the year starts. What you can't know about those 14 is the order (before the schedule comes out). Here goes ...

You play ...

6 Games against teams in your division (home and away with each of three).

4 Games against a division in your conference (rotates from year to year). This year we play the AFC West. Next year we will play the AFCE. After that the AFCS. Then right back to the AFCW.

4 Games against a division in the other conference. Again rotates. But this is a 4 year rotation, whereas same-conference is a 3 year rotation. This year we play the NFCN. Next year we play the NFCS. After that the NFCW. Finally the NFCE. Then back to the NFCN in 2013.

2 Floating games (there are rules/formulas for this that I don't believe I completely know, but apparently these are within your conference)

JUST-PLAIN-NASTY
11-19-2009, 09:36 AM
Within a division...Overall record is first. Then head to head follow by division record. In reality, Bengals have a 2 game lead on us because they won the first 2 tie breakers and that won't change. Total breakdown is below.

TO BREAK A TIE WITHIN A DIVISION
If, at the end of the regular season, two or more clubs in the same division finish with identical won-lost-tied percentages, the following steps will be taken until a champion is determined.

Two Clubs
Head-to-head (best won-lost-tied percentage in games between the clubs).
Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the division.
Best won-lost-tied percentage in common games.
Best won-lost-tied percentage in games played within the conference.
Strength of victory.
Strength of schedule.
Best combined ranking among conference teams in points scored and points allowed.
Best combined ranking among all teams in points scored and points allowed.
Best net points in common games.
Best net points in all games.
Best net touchdowns in all games.
Coin toss

Now...The even bigger part is if we don't win the division we need to finish 2nd. If you finish 3rd in a division the best you could do is 6th seed. The above division tie breaker is applied before it goes in conference. I provided a link below that really breaks everything down nicely.

http://www.nfl.com/standings/tiebreakingprocedures

DarthDeebo
11-19-2009, 09:41 AM
2 Floating games (there are rules/formulas for this that I don't believe I completely know, but apparently these are within your conference)

The 2 floating games come from the teams in your conference who finished in the same position you did in you division that aren't in the division you play that year. eg. The Steelers finished 1st in the AFCN last year and play the AFCW this year, so the 2 floating games were the winners (last year) of the AFCE (Dolphins) & AFCS (Titans).

SteelAbility
11-19-2009, 02:49 PM
2 Floating games (there are rules/formulas for this that I don't believe I completely know, but apparently these are within your conference)

The 2 floating games come from the teams in your conference who finished in the same position you did in you division that aren't in the division you play that year. eg. The Steelers finished 1st in the AFCN last year and play the AFCW this year, so the 2 floating games were the winners (last year) of the AFCE (Dolphins) & AFCS (Titans).

Thanks. Well, that explains why the Colts and Patriots are always matched up. It also explains why the Steelers and Patriots were matched up just about every year too.

JTP53609
11-19-2009, 04:05 PM
steelability, last year was very good for us because the titans and dolphins won their division (usually the colts and pats are kings of those divisions) which means since we won the division we got the dolphins and colts as our float games and the rats got the colts and pats as theirs haha,

LordVile
11-19-2009, 05:33 PM
Thanks my bretheren, it all makes complete sense now! I'm always trying to do my football homework. I like that last comment about the RATS, so true.