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fordfixer
02-23-2009, 02:37 AM
NFL Scouting Combine: Arizona coach still isn't over Super loss
Monday, February 23, 2009
By Gerry Dulac, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09054/951018-66.stm

INDIANAPOLIS -- It has been three weeks since his team lost in the final 35 seconds in Super Bowl XLIII, 21 days since the Arizona Cardinals nearly completed their improbable run through the NFL playoffs with a comeback victory against the Steelers. And the disappointment is still there for Ken Whisenhunt, refusing to go away and, admittedly, sometimes still keeping him awake at night.

Doesn't matter that the Cardinals made the playoffs for only the second time since 1947. Or that they won the NFC West Division and played host to a playoff game -- two of 'em, actually -- for the first time in 61 years. Or even that, after allowing an average of 41 points in their final three regular-season losses, the Arizona defense began playing like, well, those teams with which Whisenhunt was associated in six seasons with the Steelers.

It didn't even matter that the Cardinals came back from a 20-7 deficit and sliced the NFL's No. 1 defense for 14 points in the fourth quarter.

All Whisenhunt remembers is the outcome.

"It's very hard, just because of what we did to get in there, be on that stage and be so close, especially the way our team came back," said Whisenhunt, Arizona's second-year coach. "At some point, maybe you'll be able to get over that and enjoy what we did, but right now it's still tough. You know how hard it is to get to that game, and to be that close, it's difficult."

There was a nice note from his former employer, Dan Rooney, one of many Whisenhunt received after the Super Bowl. "It meant a lot to me," he said. "Very classy. Not surprising."

Rocco Mediate -- another person who almost slayed the giant -- called him and asked him to be his playing partner in the Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

And Whisenhunt isn't able to walk anywhere at the NFL Scouting Combine without someone wanting to talk to him, someone stopping him to shake his hand.

But he can't stop thinking about James Harrison's 100-yard interception return at the end of the first half, a play that resulted, in part, from a formation miscue by the Cardinals. Or the final drive in which his former quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger, moved the Steelers 88 yards in seven plays and threw the winning touchdown pass to Santonio Holmes.

"You know, there are a lot of things; that's what keeps you awake the last two weeks, just thinking about things that could have gone differently," Whisenhunt said.

"I thought we were doing some things in that game, all through the first half, that were effective. We were making some plays and moving the ball. But what we were doing is, we had some penalties that put us in first-and-20 a number of times, and we couldn't recover against that because it's very difficult against a defense as good as the Steelers' to do that.

"I never felt like we were in a position where we weren't moving the football. The only time I felt like we needed to go to that [open] style of offense was when we got down, especially when time was running out on us.

"Would I like to have started out the game the way we finished? Yeah. But I think we had a very good plan for that defense. There were just too many mistakes."

Whisenhunt said the whole game changed when quarterback Kurt Warner, on first-and-goal at the Steelers' 1, threw a pass that was intercepted and returned 100 yards for a touchdown by Harrison -- a play that could go down as the greatest individual effort in Super Bowl history. However, Whisenhunt said the play came about because of a mental mistake: Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic.

"Obviously, the play at the end of the half was huge," Whisenhunt said. "It was a big swing. But I was proud of our team. They fought back and came back and took the lead at the end of the game.

"We can't lose sight of the fact we got there. That's something our team had never done before. It's quite an accomplishment for the organization and our players, and you have to focus on that because the other stuff will drive you crazy."

For now, it still does.
Gerry Dulac can be reached at gdulac@post-gazette.com.
First published on February 23, 2009 at 12:00 am

Djfan
02-23-2009, 03:00 AM
Whisenhunt said the whole game changed when quarterback Kurt Warner, on first-and-goal at the Steelers' 1, threw a pass that was intercepted and returned 100 yards for a touchdown by Harrison -- a play that could go down as the greatest individual effort in Super Bowl history. However, Whisenhunt said the play came about because of a mental mistake: Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic.

Yeah. Lord knows, it wasn't because Harrison is that good.

fordfixer
02-23-2009, 03:03 AM
Whisenhunt said the whole game changed when quarterback Kurt Warner, on first-and-goal at the Steelers' 1, threw a pass that was intercepted and returned 100 yards for a touchdown by Harrison -- a play that could go down as the greatest individual effort in Super Bowl history. However, Whisenhunt said the play came about because of a mental mistake: Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic.

Yeah. Lord knows, it wasn't because Harrison is that good.
:lol: :lol:

Discipline of Steel
02-23-2009, 07:44 AM
Whisenhunt said the whole game changed when quarterback Kurt Warner, on first-and-goal at the Steelers' 1, threw a pass that was intercepted and returned 100 yards for a touchdown by Harrison -- a play that could go down as the greatest individual effort in Super Bowl history. However, Whisenhunt said the play came about because of a mental mistake: Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic.


This is my fav part!

SanAntonioSteelerFan
02-23-2009, 10:14 AM
NFL Scouting Combine: Arizona coach still isn't over Super loss
Monday, February 23, 2009
By Gerry Dulac, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/09054/951018-66.stm

INDIANAPOLIS -- ...
Whisenhunt said the whole game changed when quarterback Kurt Warner, on first-and-goal at the Steelers' 1, threw a pass that was intercepted and returned 100 yards for a touchdown by Harrison -- a play that could go down as the greatest individual effort in Super Bowl history. However, Whisenhunt said the play came about because of a mental mistake: Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic....
Gerry Dulac can be reached at gdulac@post-gazette.com.
First published on February 23, 2009 at 12:00 am

That's a QB error ... don't throw Boldin under the bus, Whiz. Warner could throw the ball away, run and get a half yard, whatever ... nobody put a gun to his head and made him throw. Hey Kurt - don't throw into traffic, you're no Ben Rothlisberger!

Oviedo
02-23-2009, 10:56 AM
Sounds like someone who doesn't believe he can get back to the big game.

Steelhere10
02-23-2009, 11:01 AM
I LOVE IT remember back when they advanced , to me he sounded like a former Steeler coach. Bill Cowher overconfident saying that he wanted the Steelers to advance to play them in Super Bowl as if he just knew he would win. for some kind of revenge factor for the hiring of Tomlin. Now i wonder do he wish different!!!

Chachi
02-23-2009, 11:48 AM
Harrison's play was the result of 3 circumstances(culled from multiple articles):

1."Anquan Boldin, the intended receiver, lined too tight to the line of scrimmage, forcing Warner to jam the ball into traffic...."

2."We had a play call where we were basically on a max blitz," Harrison said. "Kurt had to get it out, so he had to throw a quick slant in or out, and I guessed on in and basically just shifted out, flowed out, and he threw it straight to me."......"Harrison, the Steelers' right outside linebacker, read the play perfectly and cut in front of Boldin to make the interception at the goal line and take off up the Arizona sideline."

3."I couldn't see him around our linemen and the pressure," Warner said.

To sum up....

Yea, "Q" lined up a little tighter than usual and Warner didn't see him, but, why is that?

Because Harrison "read the play perfectly". That says it all.

_________________________

As far as not getting over the loss yet.....

What Roethlisberger did to them.......I don't think they will ever get over that. I know if the roles were reversed.....man....I can't imagine how much that would hurt.

Oviedo
02-23-2009, 12:02 PM
I LOVE IT remember back when they advanced , to me he sounded like a former Steeler coach. Bill Cowher overconfident saying that he wanted the Steelers to advance to play them in Super Bowl as if he just knew he would win. for some kind of revenge factor for the hiring of Tomlin. Now i wonder do he wish different!!!

What really eats at him is he now knows what the Rooneys knew two years ago. Tomlin was the better choice for the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Enjoy your sunshine in AZ and your one and done experience in the Super Bowl.

feltdizz
02-23-2009, 12:27 PM
When a play blossoms like that you can't blame anyone for the outcome besides the QB for throwing it or the OC for calling it. Just too many variables involved to point to one thing as the reason the play resulted in a pick 6.

I was screaming for a FG... begging for an incompletion...

I'll be honest.. I had like 0.75% of my mind on an INT...
I don't know if I was screaming or not... I think I was speechless..
whispering..go, go go....

ikestops85
02-23-2009, 12:34 PM
I can't blame Whiz for not being over the SB game yet. How many MONTHS do you think it took Cowher before he stopped replaying every down of SB triple X? Whiz is a good guy who has done a great job in Arizona. I wish him all the best ... except when he plays us.

We hired Tomlin and as far as I'm concerned he is the best damned "janitor" in the NFL. :tt2

feltdizz
02-23-2009, 12:36 PM
I can't blame Whiz for not being over the SB game yet. How many MONTHS do you think it took Cowher before he stopped replaying every down of SB triple X? Whiz is a good guy who has done a great job in Arizona. I wish him all the best ... except when he plays us.

We hired Tomlin and as far as I'm concerned he is the best damned "janitor" in the NFL. :tt2

I think Cowher replayed 2 plays from SB XXX... the same 2 that we all replay...

RuthlessBurgher
02-23-2009, 02:03 PM
When a play blossoms like that you can't blame anyone for the outcome besides the QB for throwing it or the OC for calling it. Just too many variables involved to point to one thing as the reason the play resulted in a pick 6.

I was screaming for a FG... begging for an incompletion...

I'll be honest.. I had like 0.75% of my mind on an INT...
I don't know if I was screaming or not... I think I was speechless..
whispering..go, go go....

I don't even remember what happened to me while that play was occurring. I remember getting up and screaming, but I have no idea what I was screaming. I was in the opposite corner of the stadium, so it was about as far away from me as a play could possibly get when it happened. I saw Deshea and Harrison kind of run into each other, and I initially thought that Deshea picked the ball off and handed it to Harrison (but why would a CB give the ball to a LB with all that green in front of them?). It was such an overwhelming play, that I think I was still saying "wow" by the time Bruce started singing. I remember being in Detroit and watching them hurriedly put the stage together and rushing all of those "fans" onto the field for the halftime show...I remember none of that this time, my mind was too blown because of the way the half ended. I wish I could remember more, but I think there may have been some sort of blackout in my mind due to the raw, sheer excitement and bedlam of it all...I was still on my feet jumping and screaming, but for the life of me I cannot remember much of the runback itself as it was happening...most of what I remember was gleaned from the replays on the Jumbotron.

Iron Shiek
02-23-2009, 02:14 PM
Ha I like the "what were you doing/thinking" questions that get posed from time to time here.

When Harrison was running that INT back, I just was not even cheering (other than the fact that the Cards didn't score). Just with all the traffic he had to go through, it never crossed my mind that we'd end up with a score. I really didn't notice the flag either so I really thought the half was ending in moments. Only until about the 20 yard line is when I picked up my son and started jumping up and down yelling GO GO GO and he scored and I almost spiked my son through my legs :D He was loving it though and always comments about "Harrison scoring the touchdown" when we talk about the Steelers.

Steelhere10
02-23-2009, 06:32 PM
Ha I like the "what were you doing/thinking" questions that get posed from time to time here.

When Harrison was running that INT back, I just was not even cheering (other than the fact that the Cards didn't score). Just with all the traffic he had to go through, it never crossed my mind that we'd end up with a score. I really didn't notice the flag either so I really thought the half was ending in moments. Only until about the 20 yard line is when I picked up my son and started jumping up and down yelling GO GO GO and he scored and I almost spiked my son through my legs :D He was loving it though and always comments about "Harrison scoring the touchdown" when we talk about the Steelers. what a coincidence i was holding my 15 month old girl in my arms jumping up and down.

snarky
02-24-2009, 12:09 AM
I watched the SB with my father and when JH was making that run back we were both dead silent. I think I just said 'come on get in' at the very end. It was an amazing play.

feltdizz
02-24-2009, 01:00 PM
When a play blossoms like that you can't blame anyone for the outcome besides the QB for throwing it or the OC for calling it. Just too many variables involved to point to one thing as the reason the play resulted in a pick 6.

I was screaming for a FG... begging for an incompletion...

I'll be honest.. I had like 0.75% of my mind on an INT...
I don't know if I was screaming or not... I think I was speechless..
whispering..go, go go....

I don't even remember what happened to me while that play was occurring. I remember getting up and screaming, but I have no idea what I was screaming. I was in the opposite corner of the stadium, so it was about as far away from me as a play could possibly get when it happened. I saw Deshea and Harrison kind of run into each other, and I initially thought that Deshea picked the ball off and handed it to Harrison (but why would a CB give the ball to a LB with all that green in front of them?). It was such an overwhelming play, that I think I was still saying "wow" by the time Bruce started singing. I remember being in Detroit and watching them hurriedly put the stage together and rushing all of those "fans" onto the field for the halftime show...I remember none of that this time, my mind was too blown because of the way the half ended. I wish I could remember more, but I think there may have been some sort of blackout in my mind due to the raw, sheer excitement and bedlam of it all...I was still on my feet jumping and screaming, but for the life of me I cannot remember much of the runback itself as it was happening...most of what I remember was gleaned from the replays on the Jumbotron.

umm yeah... so you were there... mmmk. :HeadBanger

well, I was in my seat at the opposite end of my LIVING ROOM! LOL!!!

I know I screamed like a little bi#CH after the play but while it was going on I just remember go, go, move Deshea, block someone!! go, breaks out of sure tackle...go GO GO

Scarletfire1970
02-24-2009, 01:54 PM
I never thought Harrison would make it all the way. It didn't matter though, cause I was just glad he picked off the pass. The TD was just the icing on the cake.