PDA

View Full Version : Skippy?



Flasteel
08-31-2008, 10:47 AM
Alright, I have to ask. Where did this nickname for Jeff Reed come from? I've seen it referenced quite a few times over the past couple of years and since my name is Skip, I have a certain disdain for the mockery of my name. :?

BigBen2112
08-31-2008, 11:02 AM
Im going to skip this thread.











Sorry, just being an a$$...my bad. :lol: :D

Flasteel
08-31-2008, 11:05 AM
Im going to skip this thread.











Sorry, just being an a$$...my bad. :lol: :D


That's why I didn't post the question on the Trib board. The endless parade of peanut butter comments, dog references, or other mockeries :lol: ...thanks Benny. :Hater

Les 74
08-31-2008, 11:07 AM
Maybe he liked to dip his...............oh,nevermind!!! :lol:

SanAntonioSteelerFan
08-31-2008, 12:17 PM
I believe there was a cell phone mpeg on the web where he was doing, uhmmm, creative things with peanut butter.

On more serious note, here is his wikipedia entry. Apparently he has several nick names, "Guaranteed Reed", and "Hayseed Reed". Who knew! It doesn't quite say where "Skippy" actually came from. I haven't noticed, does he have a skipping motion on the way to kick the ball?

Alos, nice to see he does a lot of charity work in Pittsburgh, nice guy, cell phone photos and movies notwithstanding.

************************************************** ***********
Reed joined the Pittsburgh Steelers as a free agent in 2002. Originally signed as a midseason replacement to the injured (and inconsistent) Todd Peterson, Reed quickly contributed to the team finishing the season with 100 points, which led to the team releasing Peterson in the offseason and making Reed their primary kicker. He is often referred to by Pittsburgh Steelers fans as "Skippy Reed," or, to a lesser degree, "Guaranteed Reed." Myron Cope, former Steelers announcer, also annoited Jeff Reed with a nickname of "Hayseed Reed." His unshakeable presence on the field has led to him making several game-winning or game-tying field goals, frequently amidst loud, hostile crowds. Reed proved that he could kick in the clutch during the Steelers 2005 AFC Divisional Playoff game against the New York Jets, as he kicked the 33-yard game winning field goal (after his New York counterpart Doug Brien missed two late field goals) in overtime to give the Steelers the victory. Reed was also a major reason the Steelers were able to compete in the 2005-2006 playoffs, as he kicked two game winning field goals during the 2005 campaign, one against the San Diego Chargers on Monday Night Football, and another against the Baltimore Ravens on Halloween to give the Steelers two crucial victories. During the 2005-06 NFL playoffs, where the Steelers eventually won Super Bowl XL, Reed successfully kicked all three field goal attempts and converted all fourteen of his potential PATs.

Every year Reed is a very generous player to his fans at the Latrobe, PA training camp when the fans line up for autographs. This year, two young girls from Las Vegas brought their Jeff Reed jerseys along with them for him to sign and he came out of the locker room and took a picture with one of them and signed both of their jerseys and many more of the fans merchandise.

Reed is also involved heavily in his community with charity work such as “Kick For Kids” which donates $300 dollars for every field goal he makes. Also he is involved in Junior Achievement, does commercials for the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, and helped a family raise money for a 5 year old who had a brain tumor.
************************************************** **********

stlrz d
08-31-2008, 12:24 PM
This year, two young girls from Las Vegas brought their Jeff Reed jerseys along with them for him to sign and he came out of the locker room and took a picture with one of them and signed both of their jerseys and many more of the fans merchandise.

Honestly, does this surprise anyone? Did he come out in a towel? :lol: :lol: :lol:

SanAntonioSteelerFan
08-31-2008, 12:28 PM
OK, here's the real reason, FLAsteel, it's from a Trib-Review article 12-02. As I read it, seems there is NO reason he's called Skippy, except that he didn't want to argue with Fu!




************************************************** ************
Rookie kicker Reed confident he can kick Heinz Field curse
By Joe Starkey
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 1, 2002

Buzz up!


You think it took guts to strut into the kicker’s graveyard known as Heinz Field and boot three field goals in his very first game?

Jeff Reed has done bolder things.

Take, for example, the time he told his father he planned to get an ear pierced. His father had a quick reply.

“I told him he would need a place to live if he did that, and the same goes for tattoos,” Morris Reed recalled Monday, as he spoke from the Charlotte, N.C., transmission shop he manages. “By golly, he did it, anyway.”

Jeff Reed is nothing if not bold. He sported a diamond stud in his left ear as he greeted reporters after his memorable debut last Sunday, when he kicked the game-winning 45-yard field goal against the Cincinnati Bengals. He must have answered 20 questions about the treacherous field before he finally made a firm proclamation.
“I want to change whatever they call the Heinz Field jinx.”

Reed has a ways to go — he did miss a field goal and an extra point — but if self-confidence and a powerful right leg mean anything, he just might make peace with the big yellow beast.

SOCCER STYLE

Reed’s quadriceps muscles are so thick that teammate Josh Miller refers to him as quadzilla. Larry Bosc, the boys soccer coach at East Mecklenburg High School in Charlotte, N.C., remembers Reed doing some incredible things on the pitch.

“Jeff strikes a ball harder than anyone I’ve ever seen,” Bosc said. “Our goalkeepers had to be ready. If they weren’t, they could break a wrist easily.”

One time, Reed took a goal kick that landed on a teammate’s foot 85 yards away. The teammate scored, but the middle referee mistakenly called offside.

“There is no offside on a goal kick,” Bosc said. “But I guess (the referee) was shocked because he’d never seen a player kick the ball that far.”

Reed, 23, and his sister, Kristen, grew up playing soccer in their hometown of Oletha, Kan., where their father coached football. Kristen, 26, would go on to play semi-pro soccer. The family moved to Charlotte when Reed was in the fourth grade.

Morris Reed, who coached the kickers back in Kansas, imagined his son booting field goals long before his son could fathom it.

“I would tell him, ‘You might want to try to kick that oblong thing one of these days,’ ” Morris Reed said.

It wasn’t until the summer before his senior year of high school that Reed obliged. Being a perfectionist, he practiced religiously, and his mother, Pam, his father and his sister often shagged the footballs.

Reed attracted some college interest by drilling a 54-yard field goal, the second-longest in North Carolina state history. Still, he wanted to play soccer in college. Nothing worked out, so he decided to walk-on at North Carolina.

“You’ll get a good education,” his father told him. “If something else happens, great.”

Something else happened, all right. Reed grew more serious about kicking when he attended a National Kicking Service camp with expert instructors. One of them was former NFL punter Gene Muriaty, whom Reed credits with helping him become an NFL-caliber kicker.

Reed earned the starting job his junior year and a scholarship soon after. He was one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, given to the top kicker in the nation. In two years, he made 28 of 36 field-goal tries and 66 of 67 PATs. The only PAT miss came on his final regular-season attempt — from 35 yards out after a penalty.

Once school was finished, Reed focused on the NFL.

A BREAK

First stop: New Orleans. Reed joined the Saints and made both his preseason field-goal attempts — from 28 and 29 yards — but was released. The New York Giants called next. Reed’s tryout at Giants Stadium was a disaster. The 30 mile-per-hour gusts killed him.

It was the only time Morris Reed sensed his son was losing hope.

“He called us and said, ‘I sucked,’ ” Morris Reed said. “But he kept working.”

Forty-eight hours later, Reed had a good audition in Seattle. That was followed by visits to Detroit and Tampa Bay. The Seahawks were keeping Reed on reserve in case Rian Lindell faltered.

In the meantime, Reed was living in an apartment in Chapel Hill, N.C., and running out of money. A college friend, Chad Love, invited him to work on a dairy farm for $10 an hour. Reed didn’t do much more than mow lawns and clear debris.

The Steelers called Nov. 18. Their struggling kicker, Todd Peterson, had broken a rib, so they auditioned four kickers in the rain and wind at Heinz Field: Reed, NFL veteran Michael Husted, and youngsters Joe O'Donnell and Danny Boyd. They attempted 10 field goals each at the dreaded open end of the field. Reed made 7 of 10, including one from 50 yards. That was enough to convince coach Bill Cowher and director of football operations Kevin Colbert to sign him.

Reed’s agent told him that if he did well, the Steelers would sign him to their practice squad. That’s what Morris Reed was thinking when his son called to say he’d signed.

“I said, ‘That’s good, man, you’ll be able to learn things from Peterson,’ ” Morris Reed said. “He said, ‘No, they signed me.’ I said, ‘I know.’ He said, ‘No, I’m kicking on Sunday.’

“I can’t say what I said then, but I said it real loud about 10 times.”

One of Reed’s first orders of business in Pittsburgh was to try to clear up the nickname thing. A reporter said he heard Reed was called “Skippy” at North Carolina. Reed denied it, but the name made the rounds on radio shows. Steelers players ate it up. Reed’s locker-mate was 255-pound running back Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala, who introduced himself as “Fu.”

Morris Reed picks up the story from there.

“Jeff said, ‘Nice to meet you,’ and Fu said, ‘Nice to meet you, too, Skippy.’ Jeff says, ‘That’s not my name,’ and Fu says, ‘Well, I’m calling you Skippy.’

“Jeff said, ‘That’s fine.’ ”

THE BIG DAY

The Reeds flew in last Saturday, where they lunched with the Steelers’ new kicker on Mt. Washington. After that, Reed gave them an inside look at the glamorous life of an NFL player. He took them to a Laundromat.

What could he do? He’d brought only a few clean outfits to Pittsburgh because, he said, “the more you pack, the less chance you have of being on a team.”

It wasn’t such a bad day.

“We drove up to a mall on 279 looking for a Laundromat,” Morris Reed said. “A nice oriental fella told us where we could find one. We spent about three hours there.”

It wouldn’t be nearly as exciting as the three hours they would spend at Heinz Field the next day. The Reed rooting section — his family, his girlfriend, his buddy from the farm and three other friends — took their seats early to watch Reed warm up. They were clad in Carolina white and blue. Kristen Reed said the fans were supportive of her brother — when he made his kicks.

“When he missed, they’d be like, ‘Oh, no,’ ” she said.

Morris Reed was horrified when he saw the field.

“When you have to bring the steamrollers out at halftime,” he said, “it’s bad.”

The crowd, which had long ago turned on Peterson, went wild when Reed converted a first-quarter extra point. The highlight was his 45-yard field goal with 4:44 left, putting the Steelers ahead 23-21. As he went back onto the field for the kickoff, he pointed to his rooting section.

“He said we stood out, because we all had Carolina stuff on,” Kristen Reed said, laughing. “We haven’t had a chance to get any Steelers stuff yet.”

Things would get a bit dicey. Reed missed an extra point that would have iced the game, but he probably saved a touchdown when he pulled down T.J. Houshmandzadeh by the facemask on a kick return with 2:45 left.

After the mob of reporters dispersed, Reed turned to quarterback Kordell Stewart and apologized for missing the PAT.

“Hey, you made it exciting,” Stewart said. “It happens sometimes.”

Reed knows that his journey, long as it’s been, has only just begun.

“You can kind of feel like a hero for a week, but I mean, what’s one week?” he said. “I have five (games) left and then, the playoffs. You can’t just have one good day and expect them all to love you.”

Oh yes, you can.

Until your next attempt, anyway.


Joe Starkey can be reached at jstarkey@tribweb.com or 412-320-7810.
Back to headlines
************************************************** ************

Flasteel
08-31-2008, 12:41 PM
OK, here's the real reason, FLAsteel, it's from a Trib-Review article 12-02. As I read it, seems there is NO reason he's called Skippy, except that he didn't want to argue with Fu!




************************************************** ************
Rookie kicker Reed confident he can kick Heinz Field curse
By Joe Starkey
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 1, 2002

Buzz up!


You think it took guts to strut into the kicker’s graveyard known as Heinz Field and boot three field goals in his very first game?

Jeff Reed has done bolder things.

Take, for example, the time he told his father he planned to get an ear pierced. His father had a quick reply.

“I told him he would need a place to live if he did that, and the same goes for tattoos,” Morris Reed recalled Monday, as he spoke from the Charlotte, N.C., transmission shop he manages. “By golly, he did it, anyway.”

Jeff Reed is nothing if not bold. He sported a diamond stud in his left ear as he greeted reporters after his memorable debut last Sunday, when he kicked the game-winning 45-yard field goal against the Cincinnati Bengals. He must have answered 20 questions about the treacherous field before he finally made a firm proclamation.
“I want to change whatever they call the Heinz Field jinx.”

Reed has a ways to go — he did miss a field goal and an extra point — but if self-confidence and a powerful right leg mean anything, he just might make peace with the big yellow beast.

SOCCER STYLE

Reed’s quadriceps muscles are so thick that teammate Josh Miller refers to him as quadzilla. Larry Bosc, the boys soccer coach at East Mecklenburg High School in Charlotte, N.C., remembers Reed doing some incredible things on the pitch.

“Jeff strikes a ball harder than anyone I’ve ever seen,” Bosc said. “Our goalkeepers had to be ready. If they weren’t, they could break a wrist easily.”

One time, Reed took a goal kick that landed on a teammate’s foot 85 yards away. The teammate scored, but the middle referee mistakenly called offside.

“There is no offside on a goal kick,” Bosc said. “But I guess (the referee) was shocked because he’d never seen a player kick the ball that far.”

Reed, 23, and his sister, Kristen, grew up playing soccer in their hometown of Oletha, Kan., where their father coached football. Kristen, 26, would go on to play semi-pro soccer. The family moved to Charlotte when Reed was in the fourth grade.

Morris Reed, who coached the kickers back in Kansas, imagined his son booting field goals long before his son could fathom it.

“I would tell him, ‘You might want to try to kick that oblong thing one of these days,’ ” Morris Reed said.

It wasn’t until the summer before his senior year of high school that Reed obliged. Being a perfectionist, he practiced religiously, and his mother, Pam, his father and his sister often shagged the footballs.

Reed attracted some college interest by drilling a 54-yard field goal, the second-longest in North Carolina state history. Still, he wanted to play soccer in college. Nothing worked out, so he decided to walk-on at North Carolina.

“You’ll get a good education,” his father told him. “If something else happens, great.”

Something else happened, all right. Reed grew more serious about kicking when he attended a National Kicking Service camp with expert instructors. One of them was former NFL punter Gene Muriaty, whom Reed credits with helping him become an NFL-caliber kicker.

Reed earned the starting job his junior year and a scholarship soon after. He was one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, given to the top kicker in the nation. In two years, he made 28 of 36 field-goal tries and 66 of 67 PATs. The only PAT miss came on his final regular-season attempt — from 35 yards out after a penalty.

Once school was finished, Reed focused on the NFL.

A BREAK

First stop: New Orleans. Reed joined the Saints and made both his preseason field-goal attempts — from 28 and 29 yards — but was released. The New York Giants called next. Reed’s tryout at Giants Stadium was a disaster. The 30 mile-per-hour gusts killed him.

It was the only time Morris Reed sensed his son was losing hope.

“He called us and said, ‘I sucked,’ ” Morris Reed said. “But he kept working.”

Forty-eight hours later, Reed had a good audition in Seattle. That was followed by visits to Detroit and Tampa Bay. The Seahawks were keeping Reed on reserve in case Rian Lindell faltered.

In the meantime, Reed was living in an apartment in Chapel Hill, N.C., and running out of money. A college friend, Chad Love, invited him to work on a dairy farm for $10 an hour. Reed didn’t do much more than mow lawns and clear debris.

The Steelers called Nov. 18. Their struggling kicker, Todd Peterson, had broken a rib, so they auditioned four kickers in the rain and wind at Heinz Field: Reed, NFL veteran Michael Husted, and youngsters Joe O'Donnell and Danny Boyd. They attempted 10 field goals each at the dreaded open end of the field. Reed made 7 of 10, including one from 50 yards. That was enough to convince coach Bill Cowher and director of football operations Kevin Colbert to sign him.

Reed’s agent told him that if he did well, the Steelers would sign him to their practice squad. That’s what Morris Reed was thinking when his son called to say he’d signed.

“I said, ‘That’s good, man, you’ll be able to learn things from Peterson,’ ” Morris Reed said. “He said, ‘No, they signed me.’ I said, ‘I know.’ He said, ‘No, I’m kicking on Sunday.’

“I can’t say what I said then, but I said it real loud about 10 times.”

One of Reed’s first orders of business in Pittsburgh was to try to clear up the nickname thing. A reporter said he heard Reed was called “Skippy” at North Carolina. Reed denied it, but the name made the rounds on radio shows. Steelers players ate it up. Reed’s locker-mate was 255-pound running back Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala, who introduced himself as “Fu.”

Morris Reed picks up the story from there.

“Jeff said, ‘Nice to meet you,’ and Fu said, ‘Nice to meet you, too, Skippy.’ Jeff says, ‘That’s not my name,’ and Fu says, ‘Well, I’m calling you Skippy.’

“Jeff said, ‘That’s fine.’ ”

THE BIG DAY

The Reeds flew in last Saturday, where they lunched with the Steelers’ new kicker on Mt. Washington. After that, Reed gave them an inside look at the glamorous life of an NFL player. He took them to a Laundromat.

What could he do? He’d brought only a few clean outfits to Pittsburgh because, he said, “the more you pack, the less chance you have of being on a team.”

It wasn’t such a bad day.

“We drove up to a mall on 279 looking for a Laundromat,” Morris Reed said. “A nice oriental fella told us where we could find one. We spent about three hours there.”

It wouldn’t be nearly as exciting as the three hours they would spend at Heinz Field the next day. The Reed rooting section — his family, his girlfriend, his buddy from the farm and three other friends — took their seats early to watch Reed warm up. They were clad in Carolina white and blue. Kristen Reed said the fans were supportive of her brother — when he made his kicks.

“When he missed, they’d be like, ‘Oh, no,’ ” she said.

Morris Reed was horrified when he saw the field.

“When you have to bring the steamrollers out at halftime,” he said, “it’s bad.”

The crowd, which had long ago turned on Peterson, went wild when Reed converted a first-quarter extra point. The highlight was his 45-yard field goal with 4:44 left, putting the Steelers ahead 23-21. As he went back onto the field for the kickoff, he pointed to his rooting section.

“He said we stood out, because we all had Carolina stuff on,” Kristen Reed said, laughing. “We haven’t had a chance to get any Steelers stuff yet.”

Things would get a bit dicey. Reed missed an extra point that would have iced the game, but he probably saved a touchdown when he pulled down T.J. Houshmandzadeh by the facemask on a kick return with 2:45 left.

After the mob of reporters dispersed, Reed turned to quarterback Kordell Stewart and apologized for missing the PAT.

“Hey, you made it exciting,” Stewart said. “It happens sometimes.”

Reed knows that his journey, long as it’s been, has only just begun.

“You can kind of feel like a hero for a week, but I mean, what’s one week?” he said. “I have five (games) left and then, the playoffs. You can’t just have one good day and expect them all to love you.”

Oh yes, you can.

Until your next attempt, anyway.


Joe Starkey can be reached at jstarkey@tribweb.com or 412-320-7810.
Back to headlines
************************************************** ************


Well, there it is. Thanks 'Tone.

I guess you can't argue with FU. :lol:

RuthlessBurgher
08-31-2008, 12:57 PM
OK, here's the real reason, FLAsteel, it's from a Trib-Review article 12-02. As I read it, seems there is NO reason he's called Skippy, except that he didn't want to argue with Fu!




************************************************** ************
Rookie kicker Reed confident he can kick Heinz Field curse
By Joe Starkey
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 1, 2002

Buzz up!


You think it took guts to strut into the kicker’s graveyard known as Heinz Field and boot three field goals in his very first game?

Jeff Reed has done bolder things.

Take, for example, the time he told his father he planned to get an ear pierced. His father had a quick reply.

“I told him he would need a place to live if he did that, and the same goes for tattoos,” Morris Reed recalled Monday, as he spoke from the Charlotte, N.C., transmission shop he manages. “By golly, he did it, anyway.”

Jeff Reed is nothing if not bold. He sported a diamond stud in his left ear as he greeted reporters after his memorable debut last Sunday, when he kicked the game-winning 45-yard field goal against the Cincinnati Bengals. He must have answered 20 questions about the treacherous field before he finally made a firm proclamation.
“I want to change whatever they call the Heinz Field jinx.”

Reed has a ways to go — he did miss a field goal and an extra point — but if self-confidence and a powerful right leg mean anything, he just might make peace with the big yellow beast.

SOCCER STYLE

Reed’s quadriceps muscles are so thick that teammate Josh Miller refers to him as quadzilla. Larry Bosc, the boys soccer coach at East Mecklenburg High School in Charlotte, N.C., remembers Reed doing some incredible things on the pitch.

“Jeff strikes a ball harder than anyone I’ve ever seen,” Bosc said. “Our goalkeepers had to be ready. If they weren’t, they could break a wrist easily.”

One time, Reed took a goal kick that landed on a teammate’s foot 85 yards away. The teammate scored, but the middle referee mistakenly called offside.

“There is no offside on a goal kick,” Bosc said. “But I guess (the referee) was shocked because he’d never seen a player kick the ball that far.”

Reed, 23, and his sister, Kristen, grew up playing soccer in their hometown of Oletha, Kan., where their father coached football. Kristen, 26, would go on to play semi-pro soccer. The family moved to Charlotte when Reed was in the fourth grade.

Morris Reed, who coached the kickers back in Kansas, imagined his son booting field goals long before his son could fathom it.

“I would tell him, ‘You might want to try to kick that oblong thing one of these days,’ ” Morris Reed said.

It wasn’t until the summer before his senior year of high school that Reed obliged. Being a perfectionist, he practiced religiously, and his mother, Pam, his father and his sister often shagged the footballs.

Reed attracted some college interest by drilling a 54-yard field goal, the second-longest in North Carolina state history. Still, he wanted to play soccer in college. Nothing worked out, so he decided to walk-on at North Carolina.

“You’ll get a good education,” his father told him. “If something else happens, great.”

Something else happened, all right. Reed grew more serious about kicking when he attended a National Kicking Service camp with expert instructors. One of them was former NFL punter Gene Muriaty, whom Reed credits with helping him become an NFL-caliber kicker.

Reed earned the starting job his junior year and a scholarship soon after. He was one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, given to the top kicker in the nation. In two years, he made 28 of 36 field-goal tries and 66 of 67 PATs. The only PAT miss came on his final regular-season attempt — from 35 yards out after a penalty.

Once school was finished, Reed focused on the NFL.

A BREAK

First stop: New Orleans. Reed joined the Saints and made both his preseason field-goal attempts — from 28 and 29 yards — but was released. The New York Giants called next. Reed’s tryout at Giants Stadium was a disaster. The 30 mile-per-hour gusts killed him.

It was the only time Morris Reed sensed his son was losing hope.

“He called us and said, ‘I sucked,’ ” Morris Reed said. “But he kept working.”

Forty-eight hours later, Reed had a good audition in Seattle. That was followed by visits to Detroit and Tampa Bay. The Seahawks were keeping Reed on reserve in case Rian Lindell faltered.

In the meantime, Reed was living in an apartment in Chapel Hill, N.C., and running out of money. A college friend, Chad Love, invited him to work on a dairy farm for $10 an hour. Reed didn’t do much more than mow lawns and clear debris.

The Steelers called Nov. 18. Their struggling kicker, Todd Peterson, had broken a rib, so they auditioned four kickers in the rain and wind at Heinz Field: Reed, NFL veteran Michael Husted, and youngsters Joe O'Donnell and Danny Boyd. They attempted 10 field goals each at the dreaded open end of the field. Reed made 7 of 10, including one from 50 yards. That was enough to convince coach Bill Cowher and director of football operations Kevin Colbert to sign him.

Reed’s agent told him that if he did well, the Steelers would sign him to their practice squad. That’s what Morris Reed was thinking when his son called to say he’d signed.

“I said, ‘That’s good, man, you’ll be able to learn things from Peterson,’ ” Morris Reed said. “He said, ‘No, they signed me.’ I said, ‘I know.’ He said, ‘No, I’m kicking on Sunday.’

“I can’t say what I said then, but I said it real loud about 10 times.”

One of Reed’s first orders of business in Pittsburgh was to try to clear up the nickname thing. A reporter said he heard Reed was called “Skippy” at North Carolina. Reed denied it, but the name made the rounds on radio shows. Steelers players ate it up. Reed’s locker-mate was 255-pound running back Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala, who introduced himself as “Fu.”

Morris Reed picks up the story from there.

“Jeff said, ‘Nice to meet you,’ and Fu said, ‘Nice to meet you, too, Skippy.’ Jeff says, ‘That’s not my name,’ and Fu says, ‘Well, I’m calling you Skippy.’

“Jeff said, ‘That’s fine.’ ”

THE BIG DAY

The Reeds flew in last Saturday, where they lunched with the Steelers’ new kicker on Mt. Washington. After that, Reed gave them an inside look at the glamorous life of an NFL player. He took them to a Laundromat.

What could he do? He’d brought only a few clean outfits to Pittsburgh because, he said, “the more you pack, the less chance you have of being on a team.”

It wasn’t such a bad day.

“We drove up to a mall on 279 looking for a Laundromat,” Morris Reed said. “A nice oriental fella told us where we could find one. We spent about three hours there.”

It wouldn’t be nearly as exciting as the three hours they would spend at Heinz Field the next day. The Reed rooting section — his family, his girlfriend, his buddy from the farm and three other friends — took their seats early to watch Reed warm up. They were clad in Carolina white and blue. Kristen Reed said the fans were supportive of her brother — when he made his kicks.

“When he missed, they’d be like, ‘Oh, no,’ ” she said.

Morris Reed was horrified when he saw the field.

“When you have to bring the steamrollers out at halftime,” he said, “it’s bad.”

The crowd, which had long ago turned on Peterson, went wild when Reed converted a first-quarter extra point. The highlight was his 45-yard field goal with 4:44 left, putting the Steelers ahead 23-21. As he went back onto the field for the kickoff, he pointed to his rooting section.

“He said we stood out, because we all had Carolina stuff on,” Kristen Reed said, laughing. “We haven’t had a chance to get any Steelers stuff yet.”

Things would get a bit dicey. Reed missed an extra point that would have iced the game, but he probably saved a touchdown when he pulled down T.J. Houshmandzadeh by the facemask on a kick return with 2:45 left.

After the mob of reporters dispersed, Reed turned to quarterback Kordell Stewart and apologized for missing the PAT.

“Hey, you made it exciting,” Stewart said. “It happens sometimes.”

Reed knows that his journey, long as it’s been, has only just begun.

“You can kind of feel like a hero for a week, but I mean, what’s one week?” he said. “I have five (games) left and then, the playoffs. You can’t just have one good day and expect them all to love you.”

Oh yes, you can.

Until your next attempt, anyway.


Joe Starkey can be reached at jstarkey@tribweb.com or 412-320-7810.
Back to headlines
************************************************** ************


Well, there it is. Thanks 'Tone.

I guess you can't argue with FU. :lol:

He is, after all, ONE BAD MA'AFALA!!!

BigBen2112
08-31-2008, 01:35 PM
Im going to skip this thread.











Sorry, just being an a$$...my bad. :lol: :D


That's why I didn't post the question on the Trib board. The endless parade of peanut butter comments, dog references, or other mockeries :lol: ...thanks Benny. :Hater


Oops. :nono :lol: :lol:

stlrz d
08-31-2008, 10:39 PM
OK, here's the real reason, FLAsteel, it's from a Trib-Review article 12-02. As I read it, seems there is NO reason he's called Skippy, except that he didn't want to argue with Fu!




************************************************** ************
Rookie kicker Reed confident he can kick Heinz Field curse
By Joe Starkey
TRIBUNE-REVIEW
Sunday, December 1, 2002

Buzz up!


You think it took guts to strut into the kicker’s graveyard known as Heinz Field and boot three field goals in his very first game?

Jeff Reed has done bolder things.

Take, for example, the time he told his father he planned to get an ear pierced. His father had a quick reply.

“I told him he would need a place to live if he did that, and the same goes for tattoos,” Morris Reed recalled Monday, as he spoke from the Charlotte, N.C., transmission shop he manages. “By golly, he did it, anyway.”

Jeff Reed is nothing if not bold. He sported a diamond stud in his left ear as he greeted reporters after his memorable debut last Sunday, when he kicked the game-winning 45-yard field goal against the Cincinnati Bengals. He must have answered 20 questions about the treacherous field before he finally made a firm proclamation.
“I want to change whatever they call the Heinz Field jinx.”

Reed has a ways to go — he did miss a field goal and an extra point — but if self-confidence and a powerful right leg mean anything, he just might make peace with the big yellow beast.

SOCCER STYLE

Reed’s quadriceps muscles are so thick that teammate Josh Miller refers to him as quadzilla. Larry Bosc, the boys soccer coach at East Mecklenburg High School in Charlotte, N.C., remembers Reed doing some incredible things on the pitch.

“Jeff strikes a ball harder than anyone I’ve ever seen,” Bosc said. “Our goalkeepers had to be ready. If they weren’t, they could break a wrist easily.”

One time, Reed took a goal kick that landed on a teammate’s foot 85 yards away. The teammate scored, but the middle referee mistakenly called offside.

“There is no offside on a goal kick,” Bosc said. “But I guess (the referee) was shocked because he’d never seen a player kick the ball that far.”

Reed, 23, and his sister, Kristen, grew up playing soccer in their hometown of Oletha, Kan., where their father coached football. Kristen, 26, would go on to play semi-pro soccer. The family moved to Charlotte when Reed was in the fourth grade.

Morris Reed, who coached the kickers back in Kansas, imagined his son booting field goals long before his son could fathom it.

“I would tell him, ‘You might want to try to kick that oblong thing one of these days,’ ” Morris Reed said.

It wasn’t until the summer before his senior year of high school that Reed obliged. Being a perfectionist, he practiced religiously, and his mother, Pam, his father and his sister often shagged the footballs.

Reed attracted some college interest by drilling a 54-yard field goal, the second-longest in North Carolina state history. Still, he wanted to play soccer in college. Nothing worked out, so he decided to walk-on at North Carolina.

“You’ll get a good education,” his father told him. “If something else happens, great.”

Something else happened, all right. Reed grew more serious about kicking when he attended a National Kicking Service camp with expert instructors. One of them was former NFL punter Gene Muriaty, whom Reed credits with helping him become an NFL-caliber kicker.

Reed earned the starting job his junior year and a scholarship soon after. He was one of 20 semifinalists for the Lou Groza Award, given to the top kicker in the nation. In two years, he made 28 of 36 field-goal tries and 66 of 67 PATs. The only PAT miss came on his final regular-season attempt — from 35 yards out after a penalty.

Once school was finished, Reed focused on the NFL.

A BREAK

First stop: New Orleans. Reed joined the Saints and made both his preseason field-goal attempts — from 28 and 29 yards — but was released. The New York Giants called next. Reed’s tryout at Giants Stadium was a disaster. The 30 mile-per-hour gusts killed him.

It was the only time Morris Reed sensed his son was losing hope.

“He called us and said, ‘I sucked,’ ” Morris Reed said. “But he kept working.”

Forty-eight hours later, Reed had a good audition in Seattle. That was followed by visits to Detroit and Tampa Bay. The Seahawks were keeping Reed on reserve in case Rian Lindell faltered.

In the meantime, Reed was living in an apartment in Chapel Hill, N.C., and running out of money. A college friend, Chad Love, invited him to work on a dairy farm for $10 an hour. Reed didn’t do much more than mow lawns and clear debris.

The Steelers called Nov. 18. Their struggling kicker, Todd Peterson, had broken a rib, so they auditioned four kickers in the rain and wind at Heinz Field: Reed, NFL veteran Michael Husted, and youngsters Joe O'Donnell and Danny Boyd. They attempted 10 field goals each at the dreaded open end of the field. Reed made 7 of 10, including one from 50 yards. That was enough to convince coach Bill Cowher and director of football operations Kevin Colbert to sign him.

Reed’s agent told him that if he did well, the Steelers would sign him to their practice squad. That’s what Morris Reed was thinking when his son called to say he’d signed.

“I said, ‘That’s good, man, you’ll be able to learn things from Peterson,’ ” Morris Reed said. “He said, ‘No, they signed me.’ I said, ‘I know.’ He said, ‘No, I’m kicking on Sunday.’

“I can’t say what I said then, but I said it real loud about 10 times.”

One of Reed’s first orders of business in Pittsburgh was to try to clear up the nickname thing. A reporter said he heard Reed was called “Skippy” at North Carolina. Reed denied it, but the name made the rounds on radio shows. Steelers players ate it up. Reed’s locker-mate was 255-pound running back Chris Fuamatu-Ma’afala, who introduced himself as “Fu.”

Morris Reed picks up the story from there.

“Jeff said, ‘Nice to meet you,’ and Fu said, ‘Nice to meet you, too, Skippy.’ Jeff says, ‘That’s not my name,’ and Fu says, ‘Well, I’m calling you Skippy.’

“Jeff said, ‘That’s fine.’ ”

THE BIG DAY

The Reeds flew in last Saturday, where they lunched with the Steelers’ new kicker on Mt. Washington. After that, Reed gave them an inside look at the glamorous life of an NFL player. He took them to a Laundromat.

What could he do? He’d brought only a few clean outfits to Pittsburgh because, he said, “the more you pack, the less chance you have of being on a team.”

It wasn’t such a bad day.

“We drove up to a mall on 279 looking for a Laundromat,” Morris Reed said. “A nice oriental fella told us where we could find one. We spent about three hours there.”

It wouldn’t be nearly as exciting as the three hours they would spend at Heinz Field the next day. The Reed rooting section — his family, his girlfriend, his buddy from the farm and three other friends — took their seats early to watch Reed warm up. They were clad in Carolina white and blue. Kristen Reed said the fans were supportive of her brother — when he made his kicks.

“When he missed, they’d be like, ‘Oh, no,’ ” she said.

Morris Reed was horrified when he saw the field.

“When you have to bring the steamrollers out at halftime,” he said, “it’s bad.”

The crowd, which had long ago turned on Peterson, went wild when Reed converted a first-quarter extra point. The highlight was his 45-yard field goal with 4:44 left, putting the Steelers ahead 23-21. As he went back onto the field for the kickoff, he pointed to his rooting section.

“He said we stood out, because we all had Carolina stuff on,” Kristen Reed said, laughing. “We haven’t had a chance to get any Steelers stuff yet.”

Things would get a bit dicey. Reed missed an extra point that would have iced the game, but he probably saved a touchdown when he pulled down T.J. Houshmandzadeh by the facemask on a kick return with 2:45 left.

After the mob of reporters dispersed, Reed turned to quarterback Kordell Stewart and apologized for missing the PAT.

“Hey, you made it exciting,” Stewart said. “It happens sometimes.”

Reed knows that his journey, long as it’s been, has only just begun.

“You can kind of feel like a hero for a week, but I mean, what’s one week?” he said. “I have five (games) left and then, the playoffs. You can’t just have one good day and expect them all to love you.”

Oh yes, you can.

Until your next attempt, anyway.


Joe Starkey can be reached at jstarkey@tribweb.com or 412-320-7810.
Back to headlines
************************************************** ************


Well, there it is. Thanks 'Tone.

I guess you can't argue with FU. :lol:

He is, after all, ONE BAD MA'AFALA!!!

Are we doing the super long quote thing again? :lol:

Although this board only allows so many, so we can't get too carried away.

Or can we? :twisted:

proudpittsburgher
09-02-2008, 10:20 AM
Are we doing the super long quote thing again?

Although this board only allows so many, so we can't get too carried away.

Or can we?

Seriously. I love the threads when it is just two people going back and forth, with no other posters in between for oh, say, two pages, and they quote every friggen time.

The FU story kind of reminds me of the Pedro Sorrano and Roger Dorn conversation from Major League when Sorrano takes Dorn's golf club head cover off and walks away with it . . .

Sorrano: Hats for bats . . . keep bats waaaaarm, gracias
Dorn: Wha, whoa amigo, I ah, you can't juss . . . you're welcome. :lol: