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RuthlessBurgher
08-18-2008, 07:31 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3538393

Here is the way the fans voted:


1) Who is the greatest player in Steelers history?

42.6% Terry Bradshaw, QB (1970-83):
Steelers all-time leading passer with 27,989 yards and two-time Super Bowl MVP.

25.1% Joe Greene, DT (1969-81):
''Mean Joe'' was a leader of the ''Steel Curtain'' defense.

11.6% Jack Lambert, LB (1974-84):
Lambert had 28 career interceptions and more than 1,400 tackles.

6.7% Franco Harris, RB (1972-83):
Steelers all-time leading rusher with 11,950 yards and MVP of Super Bowl IX.

4.5% Jerome Bettis, RB (1996-2005):
"The Bus" is second all time on the Steelers in rushing (10,571).

3.4% Mike Webster, C (1974-88):
A nine-time Pro Bowler and 10-time All-Pro selection.

3.0% Lynn Swann, WR (1974-82):
First wide receiver to earn Super Bowl MVP honors.

1.8% Jack Ham, LB (1971-82):
Regarded as one of the greatest outside linebackers.

0.9% Mel Blount, CB (1970-83):
Steelers all-time leader in interceptions with 57.

0.5% John Stallworth, WR (1974-87):
Second all time on the Steelers in receiving (8,723 yards).

Here is AFC North blogger James Walker's response. I agree that Bradshaw would not have been my choice. Although I am a big fan of some of the underappreciated guys in this poll like Blount and Ham, you have to admit that Mean Joe was the rock that held everything together on the greatest defense football has ever seen. And he gave that kid his jersey in exchange for a Coke. C'mon now.


Pittsburgh Steelers: Franchise player

August 18, 2008 1:05 PM

Posted by ESPN.com's James Walker

Readers' pick: Terry Bradshaw, QB

Terry Bradshaw certainly is the greatest quarterback in Pittsburgh Steelers history.

But the "Blonde Bomber" is not the greatest overall player in the franchise's history.

The top four players -- Bradshaw, defensive lineman Joe Greene, linebacker Jack Lambert and running back Franco Harris -- are solid choices by Steelers fans. But the ordering is off.

Bradshaw was a winner in every sense of the word, and he was at his best in big games. But Bradshaw's career numbers are not as overwhelming as one would think.

Bradshaw only completed 51.9 percent of his passes in 14 seasons. He had five years of 20 interceptions or more, including his rookie year when Bradshaw threw six touchdowns and 24 interceptions.

Overall Bradshaw has just two more touchdowns (212) during his career than interceptions (210). There were many seasons when Bradshaw was merely an average -- and at times below average -- quarterback.

Green, Lambert and Harris played at a higher level for more seasons than Bradshaw, and that trio deserved much higher consideration.

The glamour position of quarterback often gets most of the credit for winning championships, and this particular voting reeks of a popularity contest.

The oddest choices were probably a tie between New Orleans and Baltimore.

In 40 seasons of football in 'Nawlins, the best the Saints could come up with was Bobby Hebert? Are you kidding me? In 7 seasons with the Saints and 4 with the Falcons, I still think his career highlight is when George Costanza thought his last name was fun to pronounce in a Seinfeld episode. You'd think that if NFL Network was dumb enough to say the Saints had the greatest LB corps of all time (what a crock) that at least one of those guys, Pat Swilling, Rickey Jackson, Sam Mills, and Vaughn Johnson, would get more votes from fans than "A Bear."

And to all those Raven fans that were delusional enough to think that Ray Lewis should be considered an all-time great LB or that Jonathan Ogden is the best left tackle of all time, you voted for a kicker as your greatest player. :lol: I thought it was somewhat embarrassing when Gary Anderson was named the Steeler team MVP in 1983, but at least a kicker is not considered our all-time best player.

:ratsuck

Flasteel
08-18-2008, 07:47 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=3538393

Here is the way the fans voted:

[quote]1) Who is the greatest player in Steelers history?

42.6% Terry Bradshaw, QB (1970-83):
Steelers all-time leading passer with 27,989 yards and two-time Super Bowl MVP.

25.1% Joe Greene, DT (1969-81):
''Mean Joe'' was a leader of the ''Steel Curtain'' defense.

11.6% Jack Lambert, LB (1974-84):
Lambert had 28 career interceptions and more than 1,400 tackles.

6.7% Franco Harris, RB (1972-83):
Steelers all-time leading rusher with 11,950 yards and MVP of Super Bowl IX.

4.5% Jerome Bettis, RB (1996-2005):
"The Bus" is second all time on the Steelers in rushing (10,571).

3.4% Mike Webster, C (1974-88):
A nine-time Pro Bowler and 10-time All-Pro selection.

3.0% Lynn Swann, WR (1974-82):
First wide receiver to earn Super Bowl MVP honors.

1.8% Jack Ham, LB (1971-82):
Regarded as one of the greatest outside linebackers.

0.9% Mel Blount, CB (1970-83):
Steelers all-time leader in interceptions with 57.

0.5% John Stallworth, WR (1974-87):
Second all time on the Steelers in receiving (8,723 yards).

Here is AFC North blogger James Walker's response. I agree that Bradshaw would not have been my choice. Although I am a big fan of some of the underappreciated guys in this poll like Blount and Ham, you have to admit that Mean Joe was the rock that held everything together on the greatest defense football has ever seen. And he gave that kid his jersey in exchange for a Coke. C'mon now.


Pittsburgh Steelers: Franchise player

August 18, 2008 1:05 PM

Posted by ESPN.com's James Walker

Readers' pick: Terry Bradshaw, QB

Terry Bradshaw certainly is the greatest quarterback in Pittsburgh Steelers history.

But the "Blonde Bomber" is not the greatest overall player in the franchise's history.

The top four players -- Bradshaw, defensive lineman Joe Greene, linebacker Jack Lambert and running back Franco Harris -- are solid choices by Steelers fans. But the ordering is off.

Bradshaw was a winner in every sense of the word, and he was at his best in big games. But Bradshaw's career numbers are not as overwhelming as one would think.

Bradshaw only completed 51.9 percent of his passes in 14 seasons. He had five years of 20 interceptions or more, including his rookie year when Bradshaw threw six touchdowns and 24 interceptions.

Overall Bradshaw has just two more touchdowns (212) during his career than interceptions (210). There were many seasons when Bradshaw was merely an average -- and at times below average -- quarterback.

Green, Lambert and Harris played at a higher level for more seasons than Bradshaw, and that trio deserved much higher consideration.

The glamour position of quarterback often gets most of the credit for winning championships, and this particular voting reeks of a popularity contest.

The oddest choices were probably a tie between New Orleans and Baltimore.

In 40 seasons of football in 'Nawlins, the best the Saints could come up with was Bobby Hebert? Are you kidding me? In 7 seasons with the Saints and 4 with the Falcons, I still think his career highlight is when George Costanza thought his last name was fun to pronounce in a Seinfeld episode. You'd think that if NFL Network was dumb enough to say the Saints had the greatest LB corps of all time (what a crock) that at least one of those guys, Pat Swilling, Rickey Jackson, Sam Mills, and Vaughn Johnson, would get more votes from fans than "A Bear."

And to all those Raven fans that were delusional enough to think that Ray Lewis should be considered an all-time great LB or that Jonathan Ogden is the best left tackle of all time, you voted for a kicker as your greatest player. :lol: I thought it was somewhat embarrassing when Gary Anderson was named the Steeler team MVP in 1983, but at least a kicker is not considered our all-time best player.

:ratsuck[/quote:1qbjtxae]


Hebert? Really?? I thought it was common knowledge that Archie Manning was the greatest palyer in team history, despite the lack of success.

As far as the ranking of our top four guys...
1. Mean Joe
2. Franco (Greene puts him on top)
3. Lambert
4. Bradshaw (although he was my personal favorite)

RuthlessBurgher
08-18-2008, 08:32 PM
Hebert? Really?? I thought it was common knowledge that Archie Manning was the greatest palyer in team history, despite the lack of success.

Archie had 125 TD's and 173 INT's in his career with 55.2% passing for 23,911 yards.
Hebert had 135 TD's and 124 INT's in his career with 58.9% passing for 21,683 yards.

I don't care how bad of a team you were on, if you have nearly 50 more career interceptions than touchdowns, that is pretty darn bad. I think Archie is riding the coattails of his sons, if you ask me. Not that I think Bobby Hebert is any better, though. He's essentially Bubby Brister with more starts under his belt (Bubby had 81 TD's and 78 INT's in his career with 54.6% passing for 14,445 yards). Give me Pat Swilling for the All-Time Saint 107.5 career sacks and an average of just under 11 sacks per season during his career in New Orleans.

By the way, here are the stats for another team's greatest of all time and a Hall of Famer to boot:

Namath had 173 TD's and 220 INT's in his career with 50.1% passing for 27,663 yards.

He the most overrated Hall of Famer of all time in my opinion. He got all the credit for winning Super Bowl III because of some stupid off the cuff "guarantee" when his stat line in that game was a pedestrian 17/28 for 206 yards, 0 TD, 0 INT. The defense won that game by picking off Baltimore QB's 4 times. And if you wanted to pick an MVP on the offensive side, RB Matt Snell was far more impressive than Namath, with 30 carries for 121 yards and 1 TD plus 4 catches for another 40 yards.

That would be like granting Trent Dilfer legendary status because he won a Super Bowl by passing for 12/25 for 153 yards and 1 TD, 0 INT, when in actuality, his defense picking off Kerry Collins 4 times had a bit more to do with the win than Trent did.

Mel Blount's G
08-18-2008, 09:11 PM
Give me Pat Swilling for the All-Time Saint 107.5 career sacks and an average of just under 11 sacks per season during his career in New Orleans
Without knowing the stats, I'd take Sam Mills.

stlrz d
08-18-2008, 09:13 PM
Mean Joe isn't my #1 fave, but he is the guy who comes to mind first when I think Steelers.

Flasteel
08-18-2008, 09:23 PM
Hebert? Really?? I thought it was common knowledge that Archie Manning was the greatest palyer in team history, despite the lack of success.

Archie had 125 TD's and 173 INT's in his career with 55.2% passing for 23,911 yards.
Hebert had 135 TD's and 124 INT's in his career with 58.9% passing for 21,683 yards.

I don't care how bad of a team you were on, if you have nearly 50 more career interceptions than touchdowns, that is pretty darn bad. I think Archie is riding the coattails of his sons, if you ask me. Not that I think Bobby Hebert is any better, though. He's essentially Bubby Brister with more starts under his belt (Bubby had 81 TD's and 78 INT's in his career with 54.6% passing for 14,445 yards). Give me Pat Swilling for the All-Time Saint 107.5 career sacks and an average of just under 11 sacks per season during his career in New Orleans.

By the way, here are the stats for another team's greatest of all time and a Hall of Famer to boot:

Namath had 173 TD's and 220 INT's in his career with 50.1% passing for 27,663 yards.

He the most overrated Hall of Famer of all time in my opinion. He got all the credit for winning Super Bowl III because of some stupid off the cuff "guarantee" when his stat line in that game was a pedestrian 17/28 for 206 yards, 0 TD, 0 INT. The defense won that game by picking off Baltimore QB's 4 times. And if you wanted to pick an MVP on the offensive side, RB Matt Snell was far more impressive than Namath, with 30 carries for 121 yards and 1 TD plus 4 catches for another 40 yards.

That would be like granting Trent Dilfer legendary status because he won a Super Bowl by passing for 12/25 for 153 yards and 1 TD, 0 INT, when in actuality, his defense picking off Kerry Collins 4 times had a bit more to do with the win than Trent did.

I didn't realize that Hebert had more TDs and that many fewer ints, but Manning was the franchise for his entire career there. Hebert had the support of that defense and while Manning got to play with guys like Wes Chandler and Chuck Muncie late in his career, he had nothing for most of it.

I guess I do remember that town being Hebert crazy for awhile, I just never thought he eclipsed Manning in the hearts of Saints fans.

Ozey74
08-18-2008, 10:58 PM
Mean Joe isn't my #1 fave, but he is the guy who comes to mind first when I think Steelers.

I agree with you. A fantastic Steeler. As with most Steelers, did things the right way both on and off the field!


:tt2

Steel Life
08-19-2008, 12:40 AM
Mean Joe isn't my #1 fave, but he is the guy who comes to mind first when I think Steelers.

I agree with you. A fantastic Steeler. As with most Steelers, did things the right way both on and off the field!

I think the same way except it's Lambert who always comes to mind. For me it's either Lambert or Mean Joe as the "Greatest Steeler of All".

stlrz d
08-19-2008, 07:31 AM
Lambert always pops into my head too, but Mean Joe seems to beat him and get there first! :mrgreen:

Steel Life
08-19-2008, 08:30 AM
Lambert always pops into my head too, but Mean Joe seems to beat him and get there first! :mrgreen:

Well D, you can't go wrong either way :tt1

But for me the Steelers identity begins & ends with defense.

frankthetank1
08-19-2008, 08:30 AM
i also think marcus allen and jim kelly are odd choices. maybe not allen so much as kelly though. i doubt oj would be a choice haha but what about bruce smith? darrell green was also a dumb choice, there are a lot better players the skins had

RuthlessBurgher
08-19-2008, 10:26 AM
i also think marcus allen and jim kelly are odd choices. maybe not allen so much as kelly though. i doubt oj would be a choice haha but what about bruce smith? darrell green was also a dumb choice, there are a lot better players the skins had

I don't mind the Darrell Green choice. I would have gone with Slingin' Sammy Baugh for the Skins myself, but nobody has a personal connection to him since he played so long ago.

frankthetank1
08-19-2008, 10:35 AM
i also think marcus allen and jim kelly are odd choices. maybe not allen so much as kelly though. i doubt oj would be a choice haha but what about bruce smith? darrell green was also a dumb choice, there are a lot better players the skins had

I don't mind the Darrell Green choice. I would have gone with Slingin' Sammy Baugh for the Skins myself, but nobody has a personal connection to him since he played so long ago.

if i was a skins fan i would definetly go with john riggins over green. i always thought green was very over rated. even art monk i would go with instead of green

Ghost
08-19-2008, 11:10 AM
I'd have Mel Blount way higher on the list (certainly above Harris, Bettis, Swann and Webster). How many of the players listed above him had the NFL actually changes rules based on their dominating play? Blount was so physical it was determined the league needed to intervene to swing the momentum back to the WR. That's pretty damn amazing.

Mel Blount's G
08-19-2008, 11:30 AM
I think it's great that the felons have a KICKER as the face of their franchise :lol:
:ratsuck :ratsuck :ratsuck :ratsuck :ratsuck :ratsuck


it'd be Lambert for me. As far as the rule changes that Ghost alluded to, I'm not convinced Lambert didn't have something to do with the qb protection rules ("Give 'em dresses...") and we also know that Shell was at least partly responsible for the spearing rule.


With Bettis so high up on that list I don't see why Ward isn't up there. Doesn't he basically hold most of our wr records by now?

RuthlessBurgher
08-19-2008, 01:21 PM
I'd have Mel Blount way higher on the list (certainly above Harris, Bettis, Swann and Webster). How many of the players listed above him had the NFL actually changes rules based on their dominating play? Blount was so physical it was determined the league needed to intervene to swing the momentum back to the WR. That's pretty damn amazing.

Thinking of the all-time great CB's in league history, I think that both Blount and Woodson would be at or near the top of the list. The only other guy off the top of my head that I would consider would be LeBeau's former partner in the defensive backfield and a fellow member of the "bad word" club, Night Train Lane. Now that's an awesome nickname. Screw Deion. You gotta want to hit somebody every once in a while to merit consideration in my book. It is football, after all.

papillon
08-19-2008, 01:22 PM
While "Mean" Joe was clearly the foundation that began the run of greatness in the 70s I have to go with Jack Lambert. He was the attitude, the intimidator, the leader, the lawmaker for the Steeler defense when he was on the field. I have to give the nod (barely) to him over Joe Greene and it's difficult to say that.

Mel Blount is third; he made the NFL change rules because of the way he played the game.

Bradshaw would be the first offensive player to be listed.

1 - Lambert
1a - Greene
2 - Blount
3 - Ham
4 - Bradshaw

Pappy