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Ozey74
06-17-2008, 07:31 PM
I'm looking for any suggestions for some good Polish food. My circle of friends & I are a part of a "cuisine night" each month. Each month we take turns hosting dinner that features a certain nationality of food. Since I'm 1 of 6 Polish people in the state of Indiana, my wife & are supposed to serve Polish food in September to our friends. I'm thinking of Cabbage Rolls (AKA Polish Gernades) as the main dish. But, we need to have a side dish, a desert, and a alcoholic beverage of Polish influence. I thought I would ask for some menu idea's here since many Pittsburgh natives are also of Polish persuasion.

Can anyone here help a fellow Pollock brotha out? :D

Shawn
06-17-2008, 10:32 PM
Perogis are Polish right? Stuffed cabbage...ehhh. Takes a little time but I make my perogis by hand.

Flour and egg make up the dough...much like making pasta. Roll it through a pasta press into sheets.

I take mashed potatoes, prosciutto, roasted garlic, sausage, baby portabella mushrooms, sharp cheddar and blend it up into a semi-smooth filling.

Fill the pasta sheets...crimp....boil then fry in butter and onions.

I serve with sour cream and apple sauce.

The mother in law asks for it everytime she comes down. I think your guests would like it. :)

Shawn
06-17-2008, 10:36 PM
One more suggestion. I get alot of ideas from epicurious.com.

You can do an advanced search...under cuisine select eastern european. I just checked it out...145 eastern european recipes.

That should do ya. :)

AngryAsian
06-17-2008, 10:42 PM
Oz,

Had a very good golfing buddy fresh off the boat.... well he migrated here during high school and we played against each other in High School soccer and inevitably met surfing and then as the years went on and we became adults his wife (not Polish) would always cook some Polish items. I can't even remember the many dishes, but I do remember enjoying pierogi and a cold cut dish for apps with various cold cuts and three sausages from Poland: Krakowska Sausage, Zywiecka Sausage, and Cyganska Sausage.... (had to Google the proper spelling). That's all the 411 this Asian guy can give you about Polish cuisine. Good luck.

AS

Ozey74
06-17-2008, 11:02 PM
Nice suggestions fella's!! I will definitely follow-up and investigate your input. I love cooked cabbage, but I'm starting to realize most people may not find it enjoyable(especially the wives of my redneck friends).

I have been considering Perogie's (sp?) as a side dish. I will look into it further.

The struggle I seem to be having is with an alcoholic beverage. Pollocks seen to enjoy Vodka. Straight Vodka. What fun is that?

AngryAsian
06-17-2008, 11:06 PM
Nice suggestions fella's!! I will definitely follow-up and investigate your input. I love cooked cabbage, but I'm starting to realize most people may not find it enjoyable(especially the wives of my redneck friends).

I have been considering Perogie's (sp?) as a side dish. I will look into it further.

The struggle I seem to be having is with an alcoholic beverage. Pollocks seen to enjoy Vodka. Straight Vodka. What fun is that?


Grey Goose Martinis and instead of an olive you could skewer tiny sliced Kielbasas. :lol:

NKySteeler
06-17-2008, 11:24 PM
Oz, as I told you, I don't know all the recipes my grandmother used down at the church. But with a last name such as Niedzialek, they are pretty good.... As a desert, how about potato pancakes topped with cherries, blueberries, strawberries, or whipped cream?.... This was one of the few that she passed down to me (the pancakes):

-4 to 6 potatoes peeled and cut (use Yukon Gold, red, or white... NOT baking potatoes)

-run thru food processor and put in strainer to drain

-in mixing bowl, add potatoes to: 1tbsp lemmon or orange juice, 3 tbsp flour or crushed breadcrumbs, 2-3 eggs (beaten), salt & pepper to taste, 1/2 cup finely chopped onion.

-mix well

-In a heavy skillet heat @ 1/8 inch deep of oil (peanut or canola)

-With tablespoon, spoon the batter into the oil and flatten immediately with spoon.

-cook roughly 5 minutes/side until golden brown (turning ONLY once)

-remove onto drying rack and cool.

....For a little spice, sub 1/3 of potatoes with sweet potatoes... It adds to the flavor if using for desert! :wink:

sd steel
06-18-2008, 02:03 AM
I am what in Pittsburgh is considered a hunky. At least that is what Grandpa called Grandma. So Im not a pollack, but we are from Lithuania which is close enough. Perogies are the meal to serve. You can do them with potatoes and cheese, and pork and sauerkraut. Some people fry them, but we grew up eating them boiled and drenched in butter and seasoning.

As far as the Vodka shots (what fun are they?) Let everyone have 5-10 and find out! :Cheers

By the way, make sure you have a bunch of Pollack jokes, everyone loves them, and it looks like you're a good sport! :lol:

proudpittsburgher
06-18-2008, 09:18 AM
I am what in Pittsburgh is considered a hunky. At least that is what Grandpa called Grandma. So Im not a pollack, but we are from Lithuania which is close enough. Perogies are the meal to serve. You can do them with potatoes and cheese, and pork and sauerkraut. Some people fry them, but we grew up eating them boiled and drenched in butter and seasoning.

As far as the Vodka shots (what fun are they?) Let everyone have 5-10 and find out! :Cheers

By the way, make sure you have a bunch of Pollack jokes, everyone loves them, and it looks like you're a good sport! :lol:

Boiling, then frying is the way to go. Even if you go Mrs' T's, they are awesome, but I bet made from scratch is da bomb. Dem is goooooood eatin'.

Ozey74
06-18-2008, 11:41 AM
I am what in Pittsburgh is considered a hunky. At least that is what Grandpa called Grandma. So Im not a pollack, but we are from Lithuania which is close enough. Perogies are the meal to serve. You can do them with potatoes and cheese, and pork and sauerkraut. Some people fry them, but we grew up eating them boiled and drenched in butter and seasoning.

As far as the Vodka shots (what fun are they?) Let everyone have 5-10 and find out! :Cheers

By the way, make sure you have a bunch of Pollack jokes, everyone loves them, and it looks like you're a good sport! :lol:

Great idea!! When Chinese was the theme the other month, we all had fortune cookies and we all shared our fortune at the end of the meal. When Irish was the theme, we all had drinking toasts that were on index cards under our plates that everyone took turns sharing thoughout the evening. I can do this with Polish jokes. Thanks for the fantastic idea!!! :P

Ozey74
06-18-2008, 11:46 AM
Oz, as I told you, I don't know all the recipes my grandmother used down at the church. But with a last name such as Niedzialek, they are pretty good.... As a desert, how about potato pancakes topped with cherries, blueberries, strawberries, or whipped cream?.... This was one of the few that she passed down to me (the pancakes):

-4 to 6 potatoes peeled and cut (use Yukon Gold, red, or white... NOT baking potatoes)

-run thru food processor and put in strainer to drain

-in mixing bowl, add potatoes to: 1tbsp lemmon or orange juice, 3 tbsp flour or crushed breadcrumbs, 2-3 eggs (beaten), salt & pepper to taste, 1/2 cup finely chopped onion.

-mix well

-In a heavy skillet heat @ 1/8 inch deep of oil (peanut or canola)

-With tablespoon, spoon the batter into the oil and flatten immediately with spoon.

-cook roughly 5 minutes/side until golden brown (turning ONLY once)

-remove onto drying rack and cool.

....For a little spice, sub 1/3 of potatoes with sweet potatoes... It adds to the flavor if using for desert! :wink:

Thanks for taking the time to share this recipe w/me!! I would like to try a dry run of this a few month before we host.

MeetJoeGreene
06-18-2008, 11:58 AM
A Polish guy walked in to a pizza place and ordered a pizza. The pizza man asked him, "Should I cut it into six pieces or eight?" And the guy answered, "Cut it into six; I couldn't eat eight."

What does it say on the bottom of Polish Coke bottles?
"Open other end."

What's the most popular Polish fast-food restaurant?
Booger King.


.... oh. You said recipes. Never Mind.

AngryAsian
06-19-2008, 01:31 AM
A Polish guy walked in to a pizza place and ordered a pizza. The pizza man asked him, "Should I cut it into six pieces or eight?" And the guy answered, "Cut it into six; I couldn't eat eight."

What does it say on the bottom of Polish Coke bottles?
"Open other end."

What's the most popular Polish fast-food restaurant?
Booger King.


.... oh. You said recipes. Never Mind.

My exwife was polish in lineage, here's on of her jokes:


"How can you tell a Polish girl is menstruating?"

"She's only wearing one sock."

proudpittsburgher
06-19-2008, 06:17 AM
A Polish guy walked in to a pizza place and ordered a pizza. The pizza man asked him, "Should I cut it into six pieces or eight?" And the guy answered, "Cut it into six; I couldn't eat eight."

What does it say on the bottom of Polish Coke bottles?
"Open other end."

What's the most popular Polish fast-food restaurant?
Booger King.


.... oh. You said recipes. Never Mind.

My exwife was polish in lineage, here's on of her jokes:


"How can you tell a Polish girl is menstruating?"

"She's only wearing one sock."

How do you say "end of thread" in polish? :wft ewwwwwwwwwww.

Steelworth
06-20-2008, 04:43 PM
Like most in here have mentioned, Pierogi is the way to go. If you don't want to make them from scratch though, Mrs. T's is the way to go. Boil them for a few mintues before you fry them though so they soften, and don't worry about using too much onion or butter. There's no such thing with Pierogi :D

Another possible recipe. My grandmother made this when I was younger and it tasted like heaven. This recipe isn't exactly like hers but close. This is only if you want to go all out here.

Fresh Pork Shank

2 fresh pork shanks, about 3-4 pounds total
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
4 slices bacon, diced
1 large onion, peeled and sliced
1 32-oz. packaged refrigerated sauerkraut, rinsed and drained well
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 bay leaf
2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
2 tablespoons brown sugar
4 ounces beer, room temperature

Cooking Directions
Season shanks with salt and pepper, set aside. In large Dutch oven or pot sauté bacon to render fat, stir in onion and cook and stir until onion is tender but not brown; push to one side of pan. Add shanks and brown on all sides, about 15 minutes, turning occasionally. Meanwhile, in large bowl stir together drained sauerkraut and remaining ingredients. Remove shanks, place sauerkraut mixture on bottom of pan, return shanks on top of kraut, drizzle beer over all. Cover and place in 350 degrees F. oven for 2-2 1/2 hours, until shanks are very tender. Serves 4.

Oh yeah Ozey, for the drinks - here's an idea if you want to do a little more than just Vodka shots and still stick to Polish tradition. Buy a large jar of sour pickles, cut them up into like wedges or cubes, and serve them alongside the Vodka shots as chasers. Sort of like mexican-style with a lemon or lime along with a tequila shot, the Polish will sometimes do this with pickles I've heard. It curbs the strong taste of the alcohol and I've even heard that the ingredients in pickle juice can help cure or even prevent a bad hangover. Might not be too popular with the ladies, but it's an idea.

RuthlessBurgher
06-20-2008, 05:49 PM
Sorry I don't have any recipes to share, but this thread brings back memories of eating at my grandmother's (she never used recipes...she just knew how to make these things off the top of her head). While others had more Americanized holiday dinners, I could always look forward to a Christmas feast including things like kielbasa (smoked and fresh), pierogies, haluski, and paczki doughnuts. Before you eat your own Polish feast, you should exclaim "Smacznego!" (smahtch-NEH-gaw) to your guests, which is roughly the Polish equivalent of "Bon Appetit!"

Ozey74
06-20-2008, 10:55 PM
Like most in here have mentioned, Pierogi is the way to go. If you don't want to make them from scratch though, Mrs. T's is the way to go. Boil them for a few mintues before you fry them though so they soften, and don't worry about using too much onion or butter. There's no such thing with Pierogi :D

Another possible recipe. My grandmother made this when I was younger and it tasted like heaven. This recipe isn't exactly like hers but close. This is only if you want to go all out here.

Fresh Pork Shank

2 fresh pork shanks, about 3-4 pounds total
Salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
4 slices bacon, diced
1 large onion, peeled and sliced
1 32-oz. packaged refrigerated sauerkraut, rinsed and drained well
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/4 teaspoon ground allspice
1 bay leaf
2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard
2 tablespoons brown sugar
4 ounces beer, room temperature

Cooking Directions
Season shanks with salt and pepper, set aside. In large Dutch oven or pot sauté bacon to render fat, stir in onion and cook and stir until onion is tender but not brown; push to one side of pan. Add shanks and brown on all sides, about 15 minutes, turning occasionally. Meanwhile, in large bowl stir together drained sauerkraut and remaining ingredients. Remove shanks, place sauerkraut mixture on bottom of pan, return shanks on top of kraut, drizzle beer over all. Cover and place in 350 degrees F. oven for 2-2 1/2 hours, until shanks are very tender. Serves 4.

Oh yeah Ozey, for the drinks - here's an idea if you want to do a little more than just Vodka shots and still stick to Polish tradition. Buy a large jar of sour pickles, cut them up into like wedges or cubes, and serve them alongside the Vodka shots as chasers. Sort of like mexican-style with a lemon or lime along with a tequila shot, the Polish will sometimes do this with pickles I've heard. It curbs the strong taste of the alcohol and I've even heard that the ingredients in pickle juice can help cure or even prevent a bad hangover. Might not be too popular with the ladies, but it's an idea.

Believe me when I say that I appreciate all of the suggestions on here. Your suggestions are fantasic and I will give the Pork Shank (I can't say this w/out giggling) a test run. I wish you all were nearby you could be my guests later this year.

Thanks again for your post. It looks like that it could of been time consuming!!

Ozey74
06-20-2008, 10:59 PM
Before you eat your own Polish feast, you should exclaim "Smacznego!" (smahtch-NEH-gaw) to your guests, which is roughly the Polish equivalent of "Bon Appetit!"


This is something I didn't know. Thanks!! I will add this to the end the prayer before dinner